Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-two
Altar piece at Church of the Servant, Wilmington, NC. This beautiful paper mosaic is the template for a mural installed in the chapel at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC.
Generous love flows from the
Diocese of East Carolina,
especially Church of the Servant
in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Last Sunday I was privileged to share a pulpit with Rev. Jody Greenwood, rector of Church of the Servant in Wilmington. This parish is deep in social justice work, and hungry to do more. They welcomed the message of EPF, "Pray. Study. Act." in large measure because they are living that message and are paving the way to a more just world. www.cosepiscopal.ecdio.org. You will truly feel like you belong to this parish when you worship at the 9:00 a.m. family Eucharist: holy, creative, mildly chaotic liturgy, with the highlight being a "call and response" sung Lord’s Prayer, which indelibly imprinted these loving children of God (young and old!) onto my heart. From the polished concrete floor with a permanent labyrinth (often open to all for contemplative walking), to the gun violence prevention leadership which this parish has advocated for years, to their deep desire to advance racial reconciliation (and the heart for becoming beloved community), to feeding their neighbors and one another with connection, love and food, to their awareness that even though they are in a natural disaster prone area, they are called to selfless "showing up" for one another and the stranger in times of crisis — these baptized Christians are an inspiration.

Rev. Jody generously designated the plate cash on Sunday for EPF, and announced her intention to match all gifts. The parishioners generously gave. We are blessed by this gracious showing of support for our work, and are grateful for this unexpected and most welcome gift.

Join Church of the Servant and many, many parishes around the country this Sunday, August 25 at 3:00 p.m. Eastern time when church bells will peal in commemoration of the unique horror of landing of the first slave ship on our shores. Truly, yet none of us is free from the vestiges of slavery. Make a loud and unusual noise in your community to call attention to our need to ACT NOW!

Next up:
Join us in Vermont in September!
Join the Diocese of Vermont at St. James Episcopal Church — Essex Junction, Vermont on Saturday, September 7 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. to celebrate EPF’s 80th anniversary and the Feast Day of our Beloved Bishop Paul Jones!

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness.

He declares EPF’s activity is "Nothing less than

the work of God!" Join us in our 80th anniversary commemoration

with a pledge of financial support and social justice action! Can’t

make the video play? Click here: https://f.io/R37u-4rP

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Eighty Days of Peace and Reconciliation

to Commemorate Eighty Years of Action!

During the 80 days following the feast day of Jonathan Myrick Daniels and leading up to EPF’s Eightieth Anniversary on Armistice Day, November 11, 2019, EPF will highlight local acts of peace and reconciliation and work to shore up support for the ongoing work of EPF.

Our “80 Days of Peace and Reconciliation” celebration invites you, our EPF individual members, Peace Partner Parishes and EPF Chapters, to design your own anniversary events focused on peace and reconciliation within your own communities. These activities will be highlighted through our social media platforms and EPF’s weekly "Peace Out" newsletter.

Last week, we completed our transformative and inspiring EPF Pilgrimage for Racial Justice commemorating the anniversary of the martyrdom of Jonathan Myrick Daniels and the martyrs of Alabama, as well as our visit to the Equal Justice Initiative Lynching Memorial and Museum in Montgomery, Alabama. Our National Executive Council meeting and our actual anniversary celebration on November 11 in Providence, Rhode Island will culminate the Year of Action and the 80 days of Peace and Reconciliation.

How can you participate?

Have an action event to celebrate with us! Do you need resources for a Palestine Israel Network event? Contact Linda Gaither at lgaither. Gun Violence Prevention? Contact Bob Lotz at bob.lotz.epf. Southern Border Ministries? Contact Rev. Mike Wallens at michaelwallens. Death Penalty Abolition? Contact Caroline Stevenson at carolines1935. Young Adult Ministry? Contact Rev. Michael Kurth at michael.kurth11. We will have available shortly the current "Cross Before Flag" pamphlet which can be used to educate around the history of our ongoing campaigns against violence through the decades. Of course, feel free to make liberal use of Presiding Bishop Curry’s video, included in this email. Consider having an EPF celebration, inviting members of your community, your diocese, and your parish for cake and refreshments and an evening of learning about how EPF can support local peace and justice ministries. Also consider inviting our traveling Executive Director, Melanie Atha, or any one of our National Executive Council members, to join you as a keynote speaker for your event. We find these events as inspiring as you do! We have someone in leadership in virtually every region of the country:

Rev. Bob Davidson, Chair — Colorado

Rev. Will Mebane, Vice Chair — Massachusetts

Rob Burgess, Treasurer — Michigan

Bob Lotz, Secretary — Michigan

Rev. Richard Wineland, Chaplain — Tennessee

Maryann Philbrook — New York

Betsy Davidson — Michigan

Rev. Michael Kurth — New York

Ellen Lindeen — Illinois

Rt. Rev. Jeff Fisher — Texas

Rev. John Floberg — North Dakota

Jessica Jew — California

Rev. Kay Houck — Michigan

Katherine Bailey Brown — Texas

Rev. Cody Maynus — Minnesota

Make sure you let local press, your local Diocesan news service, and us know of all of your actions, events and celebrations to get the maximum exposure of your peace and justice work! Now is the time to celebrate!

Give now, and update your contact information and membership status:

Click epfactnow) so she can cancel your Vanco account. It’s easy to do and will be so much easier on our virtual office.

Are you mailing in checks for your EPF giving? Again, thank you! Please consider giving through the Classy website instead. We are now a virtual office which makes processing checks more cumbersome and expensive, so we’d be grateful if you could take advantage of this electronic option. Need help setting it up? Please let Melanie know.

While you are in Classy contributing, be sure to update your interest in the Committee work of EPF (sustainability, membership, programming or communications) and your EPF Action Group interests. We want to make sure you are getting emails from us on the issues and topics you care about. Confirm your telephone number and U.S. Postal address as well.

We want to make sure our membership database is current and accurate, so let’s use this opportunity to get all of us into one platform! Thanks for making our movement into our next 80 years so positive!

No more nukes!
From our friends at Kings Bay Plowshares:

After more than four decades of forced silence, some of the last surviving atomic soldiers share their unfathomable experiences of the atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. Click here: https://www.facebook.com/Kingsbayplowshares/posts/484436855675186?sfnsw=cl

Rally to move Congress to pass gun safety laws coming in September.
Watch this space for more details.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

August 25: Fort Monroe, Virginia

Add your local event HERE or on your best date!

Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day

Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT

Sept. 8: Diocese of New Hampshire

Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME

Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ

Oct 13-24: Palestine

Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Someone in EPF national leadership is eager to be with you during our 80 days! epfactnow

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Sunrise over Atlantic Ocean, Salvo, Hatteras Island, North Carolina, August 20, 2019
We’ve been enjoying a few days with our friends
Aida and John Havel in their lovely home on the island. Such grace
in friendships of longstanding!
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Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out: Week Thirty-One
Stained glass detail, St. Andrew’s-Birmingham, Alabama.
A miniature city skyline of the Magic City is captured
in exquisite detail in the bottom corner of the St. Andrew’s
memorial window in the Lady Chapel.
Civil rights revisited —
Birmingham, Montgomery,
Hayneville, and Selma, Alabama:
a sobering pilgrimage, and a
hard reminder of
how far we yet have to go.
As part of EPF’s Year of Action, dozens of people visited the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, AL (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and hundreds attended the annual Jonathan Myrick Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville, AL on August 9 and 10, 2019. EPF was proud to be a co-sponsor of these events with the Episcopal Dioceses of Alabama and the Central Gulf Coast. We are indebted to Dn. Carolyn Foster (Diocese of Alabama) and to Gary Moore and Joe McDaniel (Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast) for their leadership and vision. The weekend was packed full of hot, bothersome, haunting and convicting moments. All who came were moved and challenged.

Today, August 14, is Jonathan Daniels’ Feast Day. He died 54 years ago in Hayneville, Lowndes County, Alabama, for doing nothing more than the holy work of registering people to vote.

The "Lynching Memorial" as the Equal Justice Initiative’s National Memorial for Peace and Justice is known, is haunted. The memories of those heinously terrorized and murdered across the country following the Civil War hang from the ceiling like so many (more than four thousand) brown humans, and lie like caskets in the adjacent yard, waiting to be claimed. Blood and tear soaked soil is displayed in five gallon jars along a memorial wall — much like a columbarium. The National Legacy Museum powerfully makes the case that we still terrorize, exploit and murder our people of color at alarming rates, just as we did when the first slave ships hit our shores. We have so much work to do to make this country just for those we have wronged. And yet, we move as though our feet are still in chains.
Church of the Good Shepherd – Montgomery hosted Evening Prayer and a time for reflection following our visits to the EJI Memorial and Museum. Rev. Derrick Hill of St. Timothy’s-Chattanooga, TN presided, and The Rev. Dn. Tom Osborne of Grace-Sheffield, AL offered a challenging homily. We were also graced with the presence of Fr. Richard Morrisroe, who survived the blast of the second barrel of Tom Coleman’s shotgun on that fateful August day in 1965 when Episcopal Seminarian Jonathan Daniels was murdered.
Varner’s Cash Store, where Jon was murdered, was torn down some years ago, but it is still a site of veneration for pilgrims.
Jonathan Daniels was valedictorian at Virginia Military Institute the year he graduated. We were read part of his valedictory address, which was prophetic. His short life was as remarkable as his martyr’s death was tragic. Read "Outside Agitator: Jon Daniels and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama" by Charles W. Eagles to learn more. (Above — my friend Martha Jane Patton’s commemorative t-shirt from the 50th anniversary commemoration of Jon’s death.) This is the 23rd year for the pilgrimage, which was started thanks in large measure to the efforts of Rev. Francis X. Walter of the Diocese of Alabama, former rector at St. Andrew’s-Birmingham.
Pilgrims from as far away as Trinity Wall Street, Minneapolis, MN, Denver, CO, San Antonio, TX, and Chattanooga, TN — just to name a few — comprised the more than 325 souls who processed through the streets of Hayneville, Alabama to commemorate Jonathan Myrick Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama. The crowd marched to the jail where Jonathan and his friends and fellow voting rights advocates, Ruby Sales, Rev. Richard Morrisroe, and Joyce Bailey were held, then to Varner’s Cash Store where Jonathan was murdered and Fr. Morrisroe was shot in the back, then back to the Lowndes County Courthouse where Jonathan’s murderer, an off-duty sheriff’s deputy, was exonerated on charges of manslaughter by an all white male jury. The courtroom where the Eucharist was held is currently occupied by District Judge Adrian Johnson. Hear his compelling remarks here: https://www.facebook.com/dioala/posts/10156723798284007?sfnsw=cl. Fr. Richard Morrisroe was in attendance at the pilgrimage, as he often is. Hear his remarks here: https://www.facebook.com/dioala/posts/10156723797769007?sfnsw=cl
St. Andrew’s own Jonathan Daniel carries the Jonathan Daniels icon for the pilgrimage, as he does every year. The icon hangs in the chancel at St. Andrew’s-Birmingham when it is not on display for the commemoration.
Saturday after the pilgrimage, a few hale and hearty EPF pilgrims drove on to Selma, AL to walk to Edmund Pettus Bridge, to visit the National Voting Rights Museum and Institute (www.nvrmi.com) and to see the Selma Interpretive Center. It was a poignant end to a hard day.
EPF NEC Chairman Rev. Robert "Bob" Davidson preached a stirring, hopeful sermon on Sunday, August 11, at St. Andrew’s – Birmingham, AL. EPF is grateful to St. Andrew’s for serving as our home base for the weekend, and for welcoming the entire Birmingham Convocation to the Parish Hall on Thursday night to learn more about EPF. We had six different worshiping communities represented, including St. Andrew’s, Grace-Woodlawn, Trinity Commons, the Diocese of Alabama, Cathedral Church of the Advent, and St. Luke’s-Birmingham. It was good to be home!
Alabama EPF-ers joined us as we launched our Alabama Year of Action events in Birmingham on Thursday, August 8 at St. Andrew’s, Birmingham. We are so grateful to all who attended, especially Rev. Deacon Gerri Aston, who gave us access and support! The Parish Hall was packed!
Join us in Vermont in September!
Join the Diocese of Vermont at St. James Episcopal Church — Essex Junction, Vermont on Saturday, September 7 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. to celebrate EPF’s 80th anniversary and the Feast Day of our Beloved Bishop Paul Jones!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

August 18: Church of the Servant, Wilmington, NC
August 25: Diocese of Newark, TBA
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept. 8: Diocese of New Hampshire, TBD
Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME
Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24: Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great).
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
Invocation
by Elizabeth Alexander

The wind brings your names.
We will never dissever your names
nor your shadows beneath each branch and tree.

The truth comes in on the wind, is carried by water.
There is such a thing as the truth. Tell us
how you got over. Say, Soul I look back in wonder.

Your names were never lost,
each name a holy word.
The rocks cry out—

call out each name to sanctify this place.
Sounds in human voices, silver or soil,
a moan, a sorrow song,

a keen, a cackle, harmony,
a hymnal, handbook, chart,
a sacred text, a stomp, an exhortation.

Ancestors, you will find us still in cages,
despised and disciplined.
You will find us still mis-named.

Here you will find us despite.
You will not find us extinct.
You will find us here memoried and storied.

You will find us here mighty.
You will find us here divine.
You will find us where you left us, but not as you left us.

Here you endure and are luminous.
You are not lost to us.
The wind carries sorrows, sighs, and shouts.

The wind brings everything. Nothing is lost.

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Peace Out: Week Thirty
In a week made dark by mass murder by white supremacist gunmen, made even more painful by dishonest, complicit leadership in Washington, it is hard to be hopeful. Yet, we are called to pray, study and act to advance social justice. Join us this week as we reflect on a distant racially motivated murder by gun — that of blessed Jonathan Myrick Daniels over fifty years ago — as we pilgrimage to Alabama to visit the holy sites of his martyrdom, and the museums and memorials that have made transparent the depth of our systemic racism. Read on.
OUR ALABAMA
YEAR OF ACTION EVENT
IS THIS WEEK!
AUGUST 9-10, 2019
MONTGOMERY AND HAYNEVILLE
OUR AUGUST YEAR OF ACTION
STOP IS HERE!

Please join EPF for our next Year of Action event: our August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorial on Friday at 10:00 a.m., followed by lunch at the Alley in downtown Montgomery, then the Legacy Museum at 2:30 p.m., followed by a time for reflection at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Montgomery at 4:30 p.m. The next day, we will participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage to Hayneville, which begins at 11:00 a.m. on the Lowndes County Courthouse Square. Sign up now at https://give.classy.org/peaceandjustice.

Did you know that Presiding Bishop Michael Curry once preached at the Jonathan Myrick Daniels commemorative Eucharist? Be inspired and plan to join us this Saturday. Click here to watch: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=jonathan+daniels%2c+alabama&view=detail&mid=0A4E5295D63DE2B41B620A4E5295D63DE2B41B62&FORM=VIRE
Stained glass in chapel at Vanderbilt University
School of Divinity, home of St. Augustine’s Episcopal Chapel.
MUSIC CITY EPISCOPAL CHURCHES WITH HEART!

This week, we returned to Nashville after stops in St. Louis, MO for service for our RV ("Miranda") and Louisville, KY to visit dear lifelong friends, Pif and Chip Hicks. It was a lot of driving, made easier by the reward of time with people we love, and who love us so well.

Sunday morning I was invited to greet our EPF members and friends at St. Augustine’s Chapel on the campus of Vanderbilt University. Chaplain Rev. Becca Stevens, renowned for her "Thistle Farms" ministry (www.thistlefarms.org) who is also an EPF member, was away preaching in Ohio, and I was left in the most capable hands of Rev. Mary Murphy (Chaplain of their Center for Contemplative Justice). I was delighted to know that one of my old law school deans, Don Welch, is on staff at St. Augustine’s, as is an enneagram mentor of mine, Rev. Ian Morgan Cron (www.ianmorgancron.com). St. Augustine’s is assisting asylum seekers traveling to and through Nashville (quite a number) by greeting refugees at the bus station to provide supplies, answer questions, and extend kindness. Guest preacher Tom Angland reminded us that God needs us to participate in God’s goodness. It seems to me that that is what EPF is able to do for us — to give us tools to participate in the goodness of God.

On Sunday afternoon, Nashville EPF Chapter founder and Chaplain to the NEC, Fr. Richard Wineland, invited me to attend "Church in the Yard" (CitY) at Church of the Holy Spirit. This church revels in the fact that they are situated so closely to Nashville Rescue Mission (which serves Nashville’s homeless population) because the proximity provides them with so many opportunities to be Christ’s hands and feet to those who are in need. Holy Spirit’s rector, Fr. Bill Dennier, preached and celebrated for the more than 70 hungry neighbors who, despite the monsoon and lightning storm that lingered right over the city for most of the afternoon, came in for lunch and fellowship. I am told they usually feed nearly 200. The church offers this hospitality every Sunday from 2:00-4:00 in either their yard or, as this Sunday because of the weather, in their Parish Hall. Four local Episcopal parishes take turns providing the volunteers and the meal for their guests; this Sunday, it was Christ Cathedral in Nashville.

Church of the Holy Trinity, downtown Nashville. This holy space dates to 1849;
the cornerstone to this building to 1852.
SEE US IN BIRMINGHAM —
TOMORROW!
Alabama EPF-ers, join us as we launch our Alabama Year of Action events in Birmingham tomorrow — Thursday, August 8, at 6:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, 1025 South 12th Street, Birmingham, AL. We’ll have refreshments and information about EPF and our ongoing plans to celebrate 80 years of action! Bring a friend!
We hope that by now you have seen this significant letter from our leadership at Washington National Cathedral:

Have We No Decency? A Response to President Trump – from the Washington National Cathedral

https://cathedral.org/press-room/have-we-no-decency-a-response-to-president-trump/

We are so grateful for the Cathedral’s witness. The text of our letter of letter of thanks to Bishop Budde, Dean Hollerith and Rev. Canon Douglass is here:

August 4, 2019

The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde
The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith
The Rev. Canon Kelly Brown Douglass

Re: Your statement of July 30, 2019

Dear friends in Christ,

We were deeply moved and inspired by your response to President Trump, which was posted at the National Cathedral’s site on July 30. We write to express our most sincere gratitude for your witness. You have articulated the church for which we hunger and whose prophetic voice is so urgently needed in these days.

We have indeed had enough. We cherish our diversity and honor our sacred mandate to serve the least among us, to welcome the stranger, to seek peace, justice, and reconciliation, and to respect the dignity of every human being. Your words challenge us to remember that, in our baptismal covenant, we further pledge to renounce the evil powers of this world which corrupt and destroy the creatures of God. We pray for the stamina to resist becoming numb to the hate-filled vitriol to which we are subjected daily.

And, we pray and give thanks for you, who work in immediate proximity to the seats of power and thereby perhaps carry a special burden. Our brothers and sisters in Baltimore are your neighbors. The recent barrage from the President must have reflected a particularly harsh violence to your ears.

We treasure our National Cathedral for its architectural beauty, the magnificent stained glass, the glorious music, and its pageantry at times of national tragedy and celebration. We look also to you for steadfast witness, spiritual clarity, and calls to action. You have inspired and strengthened us. May God bless your work and our collective response.

In humility and respect,

Melanie Merkle Atha
Executive Director
Episcopal Peace Fellowship

NO MORE NUKES!
Holy Faith Episcopal in Inglewood, California, is supporting an upcoming event to commemorate the victims of all nuclear atrocities, past and present – with a candlelight procession through Little Tokyo in downtown Los Angeles the evening of Thursday, August 8, at 7:02 pm — the exact time in Nagasaki, Japan, that the atomic bomb dropped by the United States incinerated thousands of people in that city alone. Please join us in protest of use of nuclear arms and for this commemoration.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to EJI Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
August 11: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham:
Fr. Bob Davidson, NEC chair, preaching
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept. 8: Diocese of New Hampshire, TBD
Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
Homage to Muhammad Ali, who once famously said, "I am Muhammad Ali, a free name — it means beloved of God, and I insist people use it when people speak to me. Cassius Clay is a slave name. I didn’t choose it and I don’t want it." May we all own our belovedness so well.
Louisville, KY
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Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Nine
Stained glass window at St. Michael’s, Barrington, IL,
which hosted the Diocese of Chicago for an evening
of peace and justice last week.
OUR ALABAMA
YEAR OF ACTION EVENT
IS NEXT WEEK!
AUGUST 9-10, 2019
MONTGOMERY AND HAYNEVILLE

ROOM BLOCK EXPIRES
TODAY: JULY 30!

OUR AUGUST YEAR OF ACTION STOP
IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER!

Please join EPF for our next Year of Action event: our August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorial on Friday at 10:00 a.m., followed by lunch at the Alley in downtown Montgomery, then the Legacy Museum at 2:30 p.m., followed by a time for reflection at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Montgomery at 4:30 p.m. The next day, we will participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage to Hayneville, which begins at 11:00 a.m. on the Lowndes County Courthouse Square. Register now at https://give.classy.org/peaceandjustice.

PARTY IN THE DIOCESE OF CHICAGO!

This week, the Peace and Justice Committee of St. Michael’s, Barrington, IL, EPF and the Diocese of Chicago Peace and Justice Committee celebrated peace and justice at St. Michael’s. Live folk music (lots of peace songs) offered by the talented Donna Brooks, generous food and drink, a Holy Land slide show presented by Ellen Lindeen, and presentations from EPF and our amazing Palestine Israel Network ambassador Newland Smith, engaged the over sixty attendees from all over the Diocese. I am especially grateful to Ellen and Ric and Katie Lindeen, and Rev. Jesse Perkins and the staff and congregation of St. Michael’s, for providing the space and refreshments, never mind the vision and energy for pulling it off! It was a wonderful night of making new friends and reconnecting with peace partners we’ve made along the way this year.

Peace pole in the back yard of Ellen Lindeen, who serves on the EPF NEC and the Executive Board of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Ellen and her husband, Ric, hosted Steven and Miranda and me last week for our Diocese of Chicago event, which they generously underwrote and organized for us. Their dog, Mae, is a new favorite.
SEE US IN BIRMINGHAM —
NEXT WEEK!
Alabama EPF-ers, join us as we launch our Alabama Year of Action events in Birmingham on Thursday, August 8, at 6:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, 1025 South 12th Street, Birmingham, AL. We’ll have refreshments and information about EPF and our ongoing plans to celebrate 80 years of action! Bring a friend!
EPF’s Programming Committee needs YOU!

Are you passionate about promoting peace and reconciliation in your neighborhood, your church, and the world? Are you eager to share with others about the work and ministry of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship?

Do you love creating content and helping form and shape others? Are teaching or evangelism among your spiritual gifts?

If you said ‘yes’ to any of these questions, please consider saying ‘yes!’ to joining the Programming Committee of the EPF National Executive Council!

Need further encouragement? By joining the Programming Committee, you’ll be able to:

Boost your professional development credentials:

● share your content
● show case your expertise
● hone new skills
● emerge as a leader in the Episcopal Church

Enhance your network:

● get to know members of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship in various cities, states, and dioceses
● develop relationships within the Episcopal Church at the local, diocesan, and national levels
● meet other Episcopalians — lay and ordained — who are passionate about peace, justice, reconciliation, non-violent resistance, gun violence prevention, and anti-death penalty activism.

Serve the Church and the world:

● develop and help refine resources for advancing the mission of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship (curriculum, materials, speakers bureau, etc.)
● design and assist with planning and implementing pilgrimages
● consult on the management of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship virtual store
● plan for 2021 General Convention in Baltimore, Maryland
● review and expand partnerships with other religious and secular peace organizations

If you’d like help discerning whether or not you can say ‘yes!’ to the Program Committee of the National Executive Council, please feel free to be in touch with one of us (emails below) or with Melanie Merkle Atha, Executive Director, or

NO MORE NUKES!
Holy Faith Episcopal in Inglewood, California, is supporting an upcoming event to commemorate the victims of all nuclear atrocities, past and present – with a candlelight procession through Little Tokyo in downtown Los Angeles the evening of Thursday, August 8, at 7:02 pm — the exact time in Nagasaki, Japan, that the atomic bomb dropped by the United States incinerated thousands of people in that city alone. Please join us in protest of use of nuclear arms and for this commemoration.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

August 4: St. Augustine’s, Nashville, TN
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to EJI Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
"Flag Day" by Benny Andrews, American protest artist, and co-founder
of the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition in 1969.
This painting hangs in the Art Institute of Chicago, with this note:
"This intimately scaled, potent painting shows
a black man imprisoned by the bars of the American flag."
STAY CONNECTED
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Eight
REGISTER NOW
FOR OUR ALABAMA
YEAR OF ACTION EVENT!
AUGUST 9-10, 2019
ROOM BLOCK EXPIRES
JULY 30!
OUR AUGUST YEAR OF ACTION STOP
IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER!

Please join EPF for our next Year of Action event: our August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with “sales” about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorial on Friday at 10:00 a.m., followed by lunch at the Alley in downtown Montgomery, then the Legacy Museum at 2:30 p.m., followed by a time for reflection at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Montgomery at 4:30 p.m. The next day, we will participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage to Hayneville, which begins at 11:00 a.m. on the Lowndes County Courthouse Square. Register now at https://give.classy.org/peaceandjustice.

WHY VISIT THE LYNCHING MEMORIAL?
From the EJI website:

Lynching in America

In their report, Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror, EJI documented more than 4400 lynchings of black people in the United States between 1877 and 1950. EJI identified 800 more lynchings than had previously been recognized.

Racial terror lynchings were violent and public acts of torture that traumatized black people throughout the country and were largely tolerated by state and federal officials. Lynchings in the American South were not isolated hate crimes committed by rogue vigilantes. Lynching was targeted racial violence at the core of a systematic campaign of terror perpetuated in furtherance of an unjust social order. These lynchings were terrorism.

The lynching era left thousands dead; it significantly marginalized black people in the country’s political, economic, and social systems; and it fueled a massive migration of black refugees out of the South. In addition, lynching – and other forms of racial terrorism – inflicted deep traumatic and psychological wounds on survivors, witnesses, family members, and the entire African American community.

Why Build a Memorial to Victims of Racial Terror?

EJI believes that publicly confronting the truth about our history is the first step towards recovery and reconciliation.

A history of racial injustice must be acknowledged, and mass atrocities and abuse must be recognized and remembered, before a society can recover from mass violence. Public commemoration plays a significant role in prompting community-wide reconciliation.

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice provides a sacred space for truth-telling and reflection about racial terrorism and its legacy.

The museum and memorial are part of EJI’s work to advance truth and reconciliation around race in America and to more honestly confront the legacy of slavery, lynching, and segregation. “Our nation’s history of racial injustice casts a shadow across the American landscape,” EJI Director Bryan Stevenson explains. “This shadow cannot be lifted until we shine the light of truth on the destructive violence that shaped our nation, traumatized people of color, and compromised our commitment to the rule of law and to equal justice.”

Modeled on important projects used to overcome difficult histories of genocide, apartheid, and horrific human rights abuses in other countries, EJI’s sites are designed to promote a more hopeful commitment to racial equality and just treatment of all people.

The Peace and Justice Memorial Center

Built to enhance the public and community education goals of the Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the center is home to a new monument that honors victims of racial terror lynchings and racial violence between 1950 and 1959. The center is located on Caroline Street, directly across from the entrance to the National Memorial.

EPF Communications Committee needs you!

Hi! My name is Kay Houck and I represent the Communications Committtee for the Episcopal Peace Fellowship. I am looking for creative people who would be willing to work on developing and implementing a communications strategy for EPF. Those with gifts with design and navigating social media are a welcome addition to the team. Even if you do not consider yourself to be a tech savvy person, there is still a place for writers and visionaries on the Communications Team. Together our ministry will include providing content for EPF’s website, social media, and newsletter; managing social media and comments; blogging; and assisting with virtual office details. To ask questions or to share how you might help, email me at revkaymhouck

Eastern Shore of Lake Michigan and Traverse City, Michigan

This week, Steven and I were welcomed to Grace Episcopal Church in Traverse City, Michigan after traveling through Grand Rapids, Shelby, Grand Haven, and Ludington. What a beautiful area of the country this is! I was not expecting enormous sand dunes, seagulls, and so many lakes — Michigan is quite a natural treasure. Fruit and flowers are everywhere!

Betsy Davidson of EPF’s National Executive Committee had invited us to be at Grace this past Sunday. We were provided parking for Miranda in the driveway to the rectory, thanks to interim rector Rev. Kathryn Costas, who was a generous hostess for us. In addition to worshipping with Grace, I also had the opportunity to hear the choral masterpiece, “Considering Matthew Shepherd” at Interlochen Arts Camp in nearby Interlochen, MI. It was a hauntingly beautiful concert, composed by the acclaimed Craig Hella Johnson and performed by the students and community members (including four parishioners from Grace) of Interlochen on a perfect summer afternoon. Matt’s story is hard to hear, and it was achingly rendered.

What Grace — a relatively small parish in the heart of a resort town — is able to do for their significant chronic homeless population is astounding. Grace birthed their Jubilee Ministries House right on their campus over fifteen years ago. Each week, a team of 21 dedicated volunteers provide hospitality for between 50 and 65 homeless adults each day (says one, “I am not homeless — I am houseless — I have Jubilee House”) between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm. Guests have access to secure storage for their personal effects, access to computers for resume writing and applying for jobs, showers, laundry facilities, food and drink, privacy and social work support. Grace volunteers live out their baptismal covenant to “respect the dignity of every person” and share the burden and privilege of service with other volunteers from the community. Their guests are dignified and honored, even in death, with the Jubilee House Cross, shown above, commissioned by one of the guests of Jubilee House, Don, when one of their number, Kat, died of an overdose. Made of wood by Grace member Ken Andrews, from wood harvested from the property of Ken and his wife, Glenda, the names of the deceased are hung from the Jubilee House Cross, and the cross is processed around Traverse City, from church to church, holy site to holy site, honoring the deceased children of God. To the moment, 46 lives are commemorated. The cross is regarded as an icon of the city.

Grace is a warm, loving church filled with devoted followers of Christ, leading by example with enormous energy and humility. It was an honor to be with them.

Peace pole outside Grace – Traverse City declares “May Peace Prevail on Earth” in Ojibway, in homage to those native to this part of Michigan. The pole is adorned with the names of the individuals and groups which Grace has selected to award its peacemaking recognition, among them NEC member Betsy Davidson and their EPF chapter.
DIOCESE OF CHICAGO, PLEASE JOIN US THIS WEEK
IN BARRINGTON!
Advocacy against drone warfare
Advocacy against drone warfare is such important work – drones have become the preferred method for waging war, requiring no US boots on the ground. Drone operators, unlike combat pilots, go home to their families after their shift. Only the people of color living under drone surveillance and targeting – alleged “terrorists” and civilians alike – pay the blood toll of this new warfare. The Church must stand against the moral hazard of ignoring this “invisible” combat that produces only foreign deaths. Whether slaughter is delivered by nearby troops themselves at risk, or by piloted aircraft, or by drones, the Jesus Movement must be firm in rejecting every means of destroying life and love. We call for peace!

Registration deadline July 26! Only ten spots left!

EPF would like to send a few of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward. We have two committed volunteers — Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ. and Bob Lotz of Lexington, MI. There is still room for more! Are you interested in this opportunity? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow

SEE US IN BIRMINGHAM!
Alabama EPF-ers, join us as we launch our Alabama Year of Action events in Birmingham on Thursday, August 8, at 6:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, 1025 South 12th Street, Birmingham, AL. We’ll have refreshments and information about EPF and our ongoing plans to celebrate 80 years of action! Bring a friend!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

July 25: Diocese of Chicago, St. Michael’s, Barrington, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to EJI Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp Paul Jones’ feast day
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking “Miranda”, her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
North Breakwater Lighthouse in Lake Michigan, Ludington, MI
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Seven
One of the most vital things EPF did this week was speak out against our country’s policy of detaining asylum seekers. As did many around the U.S., we raised our voices and our hearts in unison to demand an end to human detention camps on Friday night in Bronson Park, Kalamazoo, MI. The action was sponsored by Kalamazoo First Congregational UCC. Shown here is a cage which the UCC church was given permission to erect in the park in protest to the detention facilities along our southern border. The cage is filled with flowers, which are intentionally not tended, with predictable results. It is a haunting metaphor. Visitors to the cage were invited to leave encouraging notes for asylum-seekers, which will be translated and taken to the detention centers to show love and support.
EPF gathered a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, for prayers, a commemoration, and a picnic, on Saturday, July 13. We were joined by members of St. Thomas, Battle Creek and by one of Sojourner’s descendants, great nephew Thomas McLiechey, shown with us, far right, end of the first row. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20.
EPF Membership Committee needs
your energy and vision!

Your EPF Executive Council needs your help today. Yes, today. One of the ways to help is by volunteering to serve on the membership committee. What is that? To quote, it “creates the requirements and commitments for EPF membership for individuals; recruiting member initiatives; help look at donor and contact database management; chapter and peace partner recruiting”, unquote. That’s a lot of somewhat dry language that speaks to how we grow and sustain our membership. The EPF is celebrating 80 years of continued existence and struggle. Struggle for urging those in the Episcopal Church and beyond to take action to bring about change for peace and justice. This is a time to make that big leap to step our of your comfort zone and help the EPF at the national level.

Volunteering is the path forward to strengthen the work of our organization. Step back and think about this work, familiar to you all, we’re sure. Volunteering is known to improve health, bring about personal satisfaction, purpose, and a sense of accomplishment. Further, it can influence community and have a positive influence on others’ lives.

Your national executive council needs your volunteer help to be more visible, have a louder voice, and to have a bigger impact in creating the difference we all want. Consider the membership committee as a possible way for you to help.

And, the good news is that this is not a life time commitment. We know you have many demands on your time. You can let the Council know your time commitment for service.

Contact Melanie Atha at epfactnow, or Rev. Bob Davidson at frbobdav

Submitted by the Membership Committee leadership Betsy Davidson (Traverse City, MI) and Rev. Richard Wineland (Nashville, TN)

THE WEEK THAT WAS!

The Province V Big Provincial Gathering in Kalamazoo was a success! With big goals of "Connect. Network. Support." the meeting gave participants plenty of chances to meet others who shared their interests in mission and ministry and to find resources for effective future ministries. Keynote speaker Rev. Lorenzo Lebrija of the Diocese of Los Angeles gave us the skills and the courage to try something new (https://www.trytank.org). More than 300 Episcopalians from across Province V and beyond enjoyed worship, music, food, and break out sessions on everything from establishing a "Peace Camp" for youth to finding paths to racial reconciliation to inspiring lay preachers to occupy a pulpit to evangelism and care for creation. Best new find for racial reconciliation with Native Americans: www.greatlakespeacecenter.com. There was a lot to choose from at the gathering, and organizers Heather Barta and Gennie Collard are to be commended for pulling it off with such grace and joy.

On Sunday, I worshipped with St. Thomas, Battle Creek, MI (sanctuary shown above left), where I was heartened to meet fellow pilgrims from as far away as Pensacola, Florida and to see again those who had joined us for our commemoration of Sojourner Truth the day before. St. Thomas feeds the hungry breakfast every weekday morning and has monthly services with Calhoun County inmates through their prison ministry. www.stthomasbc.org

EPF leadership at the "Lights for Liberty" event in Kalamazoo: Melanie Atha, Bob Lotz, Rev. Kay Houck, Rick Russell and Rob Burgess.
DIOCESE OF CHICAGO, PLEASE JOIN US THIS MONTH!
Advocacy against drone warfare
Advocacy against drone warfare is such important work – drones have become the preferred method for waging war, requiring no US boots on the ground. Drone operators, unlike combat pilots, go home to their families after their shift. Only the people of color living under drone surveillance and targeting – alleged “terrorists” and civilians alike – pay the blood toll of this new warfare. The Church must stand against the moral hazard of ignoring this “invisible” combat that produces only foreign deaths. Whether slaughter is delivered by nearby troops themselves at risk, or by piloted aircraft, or by drones, the Jesus Movement must be firm in rejecting every means of destroying life and love. We call for peace!

Registration deadline July 26! Only ten spots left!

EPF would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. We have one committed volunteer — Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ. Are you Interested in this opportunity? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow

EPF Reception at Province V Big Provincial Gathering
EPF hosted a reception at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in Kalamazoo last week. Among our Province V leadership, shown here, are Rob Burgess (Benton Harbor, MI), Bob Lotz (Lexington, MI), Betsy Davidson (Traverse City, MI), Newland Smith (Evanston, IL) and Rev. Kay Houck (Lexington, MI).
REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
FOR OUR ALABAMA
YEAR OF ACTION EVENT!
Make plans now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: our August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorial on Friday at 10:00 a.m., followed by lunch at the Alley in downtown Montgomery, then the Legacy Museum at 2:30 p.m., followed by a time for reflection at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Montgomery at 4:30 p.m. The next day, we will participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage to Hayneville, which begins at 11:00 a.m. on the Lowndes County Courthouse Square. Registration available now at https://give.classy.org/peaceandjustice.
SEE US IN BIRMINGHAM!
Alabama EPF-ers, join us as we launch our Alabama Year of Action events in Birmingham on Thursday, August 8, at 6:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s, Birmingham. We’ll have refreshments and information about EPF and our ongoing plans to celebrate 80 years of action! Bring a friend!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Diocese of Chicago, St. Michael’s, Barrington, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to EJI Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp Paul Jones’ feast day
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
Beautiful Battle Creek, MI
STAY CONNECTED
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Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Six
No Mistake: Cleveland Rocks!
Members of Trinity Cathedral, Cleveland are ready to celebrate
EPF’s 80th Anniversary year with lots of action and energy!
Details below.
(Photo credit Pam Turos)
THIS WEEK!
Join us in Kalamazoo!
Our next big stop for EPF’s 80th Year of Action will be in Kalamazoo this weekend for the Province V Big Provincial Gathering!
Join me and several members of EPF, including leadership:
Bob Lotz, Rev. Kay Houck, Rob Burgess, Ellen Lindeen and Betsy Davidson.
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
EPF is gathering a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, for prayers, a commemoration, and a picnic, immediately following the Province V Big Provincial Meeting in Kalamazoo. Time is 4:00 pm on Saturday, July 13, at the corner of Division and Michigan Avenue in Battle Creek. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20.
One more "don’t miss" event in Kalamazoo: speaking out against our country’s policy of detaining asylum seekers. Please join us as we raise our voices and our hearts in unison to demand an end to human detention camps. Friday night, July 12, 7-10 p.m. at Bronson Park, 200 South Rose Street, Kalamazoo, MI. Those of us attending the BPG event will walk over after our EPF reception to light a candle. Sponsored by Kalamazoo First Congregational UCC.

Holy, Holy, Holy. Cleveland’s Trinity Cathedral is home to God’s grace and radical hospitality. This amazing family of dedicated disciples showed Steven, Miranda and me a generous welcome and ongoing love and support for the four days we were blessed to be a part of their community. Hospitality is second nature to them, it seems.

Just by way of small example, here’s a news story about gracious hospitality offered by Trinity members: "Asylum-seeker from Haiti finds an army of supporters in Cleveland"
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/asylum-seeker-from-haiti-finds-an-army-of-supporters-in-cleveland-2019-06-30/

Trinity’s EPF is wisely focusing on three primary initiatives: eradicating human trafficking, advocating against US involvement in the war in Yemen, and working to abolish the death penalty in Ohio. They are dedicated to prayer, study and action on these three, and have had speakers on human trafficking and are planning yet another; they will invite a speaker to present educational information on the tragic war in Yemen and the ongoing struggles in Palestine; and have several plans for deep learning on advocacy against the death penalty. They have signs posted in their public areas giving victims information about who to call if they need rescue from exploitation. While I was there, they were creating social medial posts-public service announcements to educate people about what to look for during the ongoing Major League Baseball All-Star Games to try to make Cleveland safe from trafficking. The group is planning to expand by engaging with other parishes in the Diocese of Ohio to increase the scope of their reach and to include advocacy on other important issues such as gun control and criminal justice reform. They will celebrate Paul Jones’ Feast Day on September 4 and "International Peace Day" on September 21. As well, they are planning their own celebration of EPF’s 80th birthday in November. Their level of effective activity is motivating!

Bruce Freeman and Debbie Hunter are the local conveners of the EPF group, and they and the clergy and staff at Trinity really pulled out all the stops to make our visit wonderful. Miranda was parked and plugged in at the Cathedral parking lot. Being downtown, we were close to the bike paths and all the great food and sights. Debbie presented us with public transit and city maps when we arrived, we had meals together with both Bruce and Debbie and with the rest of the "usual suspects." They most helpfully loaded us up before we even got to town with suggestions for enjoying their beautiful city. They fed us literally and spiritually and made us feel loved. I am not usually able to give folks much notice of when we might be visiting, and I do know how much trouble it can be to make ready for us. So, that this entire church community made time and provision for us is humbling. We are profoundly grateful.

A word about the city of Cleveland: what a delight! Did you know that they have a cultural district, Cleveland Cultural Gardens, in Rockefeller Park, where the world’s nations are invited to establish icons and monuments to share their art and culture? An entire greenway is filled with global connection and peace. Truly, this one aspect makes Cleveland "City of the World" as far as I am concerned. Steven and I rode bikes through the park and were enchanted. www.clevelandculturalgardens.org. Cleveland has a world class art museum, which is chocked full of medieval art, illuminated books of hours, and an amazing display of the Cuyahoga River brought to life with, of all things and ironically, gunpowder (Cleveland is pretty good at humility and laughing at its former, imperfect self!). And of course, there is the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, where we got to see a film of Prince playing "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" with Eric Clapton, Tom Petty, Steve Winwood, Jeff Lynne, and Dhani Harrison (George Harrison’s son). Memorable and moving.

I loved our time in Cleveland. Can you tell?

Trinity Cathedral is both majestic and accessible. Love lives here, emanating from the
hearts of her faithful.
Advocacy against drone warfare
Advocacy against drone warfare is such important work – drones have become the preferred method for waging war, requiring no US boots on the ground. Drone operators, unlike combat pilots, go home to their families after their shift. Only the people of color living under drone surveillance and targeting – alleged “terrorists” and civilians alike – pay the blood toll of this new warfare. The Church must stand against the moral hazard of ignoring this “invisible” combat that produces only foreign deaths. Whether slaughter is delivered by nearby troops themselves at risk, or by piloted aircraft, or by drones, the Jesus Movement must be firm in rejecting every means of destroying life and love. We call for peace!

Registration deadline July 26! Only ten spots left!

EPF would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. We have one committed volunteer — Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ. Are you Interested in this opportunity? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
FOR OUR ALABAMA
YEAR OF ACTION EVENT!
Make plans now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: our August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorial on Friday at 10:00 a.m., followed by lunch at the Alley in downtown Montgomery, then the Legacy Museum at 2:30 p.m., followed by a time for reflection at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Montgomery at 4:30 p.m. The next day, we will participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage to Hayneville, which begins at 11:00 a.m. on the Lowndes County Courthouse Square. Registration available now at https://give.classy.org/peaceandjustice.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 12: Lights for Liberty, Kalamazoo, MI
July 13: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI
July 14: St. Thomas, Battle Creek, MI
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: St. Michael’s, Barrington, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to EJI Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
Rainbow over Streetsboro, Ohio on Independence Day
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
Weekly Update from Melanie
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Twenty-Five
Our next big stop for EPF’s 80th Year of Action will be in Kalamazoo next week for the Province V Big Provincial Gathering!
Join me and several members of EPF, including leadership:
Bob Lotz, Rev. Kay Houck, Rob Burgess and Betsy Davidson.
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
EPF is gathering a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, for prayers, a commemoration, and a picnic, immediately following the Province V Big Provincial Meeting in Kalamazoo. Time is 4:00 pm on Saturday, July 13, at the corner of Division and Michigan Avenue in Battle Creek. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20.
One more "don’t miss" event in Kalamazoo: speaking out against our country’s policy of detaining asylum seekers. Please join us as we raise our voices and our hearts in unison to demand an end to human detention camps. Friday night, July 12, 7-10 p.m. at Bronson Park, 200 South Rose Street, Kalamazoo, MI. Those of us attending the BPG event will walk over after our EPF reception to light a candle. Sponsored by Kalamazoo First Congregational UCC.
This week took us from North Carolina into Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. We found ourselves unexpectedly devastated in Bedford, Virginia, home of the National D-Day Memorial (www.dday.org). The small community was graced with being the home for the memorial because Bedford lost more young men per capita than any other town in the country. Nineteen of the thirty four of the Bedford Boys died on the first day of the invasion, with four more dying during the rest of the Normandy campaign. We were invited to imagine the town of 3,200 gathered in the Presbyterian church, across the street from the telegraph office, where the news of the lost trickled in. I could almost hear the stones cry as we walked down the street, which is flanked by banners on the light poles with the faces and names of the dead. Feeling the magnitude of the loss to this one community was hard to bear, and when you measure that out over the losses realized around the country, then around the globe, in that war, it is unimaginable. Wars must cease. We are called to resolve our conflicts, great and small, nonviolently, and with love.

On Thursday and Friday, I attended Episcopal Migration Ministries ‘"Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action" training in Washington DC. We learned information and skills for advocating our legislators to shore up and support our refugee resettlement and asylum programs, then went to Capitol Hill to actually meet with our senators’ and representatives’ staffs to lobby. I am so grateful that the Episcopal Church is so dedicated to this issue and is so effective at enlisting and empowering us to do this life-saving work.

On Sunday, I worshipped at one of the oldest parishes in the country, Grace Episcopal Church, in Columbia, MD. The new church building sits behind the several hundred year old cemetery, through which I walked to get into the sanctuary. Our opening hymn was "The Church’s One Foundation" and "mystic sweet communion with those whose rest is won" felt about right.

Sunday afternoon was spent with EPF PIN member, Steve France and members of the Diocese of Washington Holy Land Committee, which is a group which includes members from the former District of Columbia Chapter of EPF. By reason of their former companion diocese relationship with the Diocese of Jerusalem, the group is already deeply attached to the mission of bringing justice for the Palestinians. They have sincere interest in exploring whether or not reviving their EPF chapter will be beneficial to their work and their Diocese, and I hope they do. There is so much happening in social justice in the District, in Maryland and in Northern Virginia, that having an EPF network will only strengthen their efforts and connections to answering their baptismal call to peacemaking and justice.

EPF members Joe McDaniel, Jr. (Diocese of Central Gulf Coast) and Rev. Dr. Tommie Lee Watkins, Jr. (Diocese of Alabama, rector of St. Andrew’s-Birmingham) were among the faithful learning advocacy in support of refugees at Episcopal Migration Ministries’ "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action" in Washington, DC. Both men are in leadership for EPF’s August pilgrimage to Alabama for the Jonathan Daniels Commemoration and visit to the Lynching Memorial. EPF member also present, but not pictured, was Richard Jordan, convener of the St. Bartholomew’s (Manhattan) Chapter of EPF. It was great to be with these men doing this holy work!
Christ Episcopal Church "Old Brick" in Columbia, MD.
This church building dates to 1809. The parish was founded in 1711.
Advocacy against drone warfare
Advocacy against drone warfare is such important work – drones have become the preferred method for waging war, requiring no US boots on the ground. Drone operators, unlike combat pilots, go home to their families after their shift. Only the people of color living under drone surveillance and targeting – alleged “terrorists” and civilians alike – pay the blood toll of this new warfare. The Church must stand against the moral hazard of ignoring this “invisible” combat that produces only foreign deaths. Whether slaughter is delivered by nearby troops themselves at risk, or by piloted aircraft, or by drones, the Jesus Movement must be firm in rejecting every means of destroying life and love. We call for peace!

EPF would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. We have one committed volunteer — Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ. Are you Interested in this opportunity? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow

Mark your calendars now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org), and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorials on Friday, the Legacy Museum at 10:00 a.m., followed by lunch, then the Memorial at 2:15 pm, followed by a time for reflection at a Montgomery area Episcopal church. The next day, we will participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Registration coming soon, so watch this space!
Thanks to Steve France of our EPF Palestine Israel Network for this announcement:

The extreme, right-wing, Fundamentalist Christian Zionists of "Christians United for Israel" are coming July 7-9 in their thousands for their annual "Washington Summit" at the Convention Center. Their mission: place heavy constituent pressure on Congress to ramp up support for even harsher (indeed apocalyptic) policies against the Palestinians.

BUT for the first time, CUFI will be met by an unprecedented, highly organized protest from Christians, Muslims and Jews — and all who support Palestinian rights. Among Christians, we who believe that the Gospel calls on us to pursue justice for all, peace, brotherhood, and respect for the dignity of all people must not be silent. Church-based supporters of Palestinian rights must raise our voices — nonviolently, faithfully, AND BOLDLY.

The protest is being organized by Friends of Sabeel North America, with the active support of Jewish Voice for Peace and American Muslims for Palestine. EPF-PIN has endorsed the action and has tasked DC members to help with preparations. FOSNA is urging people to register on their website (fosna.org) so as to ensure that this action, which is just the start of a long-term, national campaign to expose and oppose CUFI, will be a model of tolerance, restraint and seriousness.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

July 7: Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Cleveland, OH
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 12: Lights for Liberty, Kalamazoo, MI
July 13: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI
July 14: St. Thomas, Battle Creek, MI
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Chicago, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to EJI Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (a home driveway or church parking lot is great)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
Butterfly bush growing on the farm of John and Dayna Tirado, Bedford, Virginia.
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Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Four
EPF’s Year of Action continues with our August Pilgrimage to
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and
the National Legacy Museum in Montgomery, AL
August 9, 2019.
North Dallas EPF Chapter Convener Ron Damholt went on a pilgrimage in April to several sites significant to the Civil Rights era, including some of the sites we will visit on our late summer pilgrimage to Alabama. Below, Ron previews what some of our pilgrimage may look and feel like. Read on, and be inspired to join us, and be transformed.

In quieter moments, I find myself still gently descending a broad floor leading to the core of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which commemorates one of the true “hearts of darkness” of our country. Immense matte black rectangular blocks of corten steel, together bearing the names of over 4400 victims of lynching between 1877 and 1950, hang overhead; the constant, insistent sound of a wall of falling water resonates around me.

I pass by dozens of metal plaques bearing inscriptions. “Henry Patterson was lynched in Labelle, Florida, in 1926 for asking a white woman for a drink of water.” “Nathan Bird was lynched near Luling, Texas, in 1902, for refusing to turn his teenaged son over to a mob; his son, accused of fighting with a white boy, was also lynched.” “Calvin Kimblern was lynched by a mob of at least 3,000 people in Pueblo, Colorado, in 1900.”

On April 3, 2019, 36 parishioners from Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration in Dallas, TX departed on a Civil Rights tour to Alabama and Mississippi. We were led by our rector, Fr. Casey Shobe, and by Rev. Michael Waters, pastor of Joy Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Church in Dallas. And I believe it’s not an overstatement to say that our lives were about to be changed.

We traveled together for five days, visiting carefully chosen sites of historic significance: 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, where protesters were schooled in principles of nonviolence, and which in September 1963 would become the site of a bombing which would take the lives of four young girls; the Montgomery home of Dr. Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King, and the church Dr. King pastored; the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, over which we walked in silence, two-by-two, to gain a small sense of what marchers must have anticipated as they processed toward the police blockade on “Bloody Sunday” in 1965; the park in Hayneville, Alabama where Jonathan Myrick Daniels*, an Episcopal seminarian and civil rights activist, was shot to death while shielding a young black girl.

Thanks largely to Rev. Waters’ own work for racial justice – and relationships he has developed along the Way – we also received the gift of personal encounters with several who have led in the struggle for justice, who have “shared in the sufferings of Christ.” Ms. Janice Kelsey Wesley, a Birmingham educator, participated in the 1963 Children’s March and was one of nearly 2000 children arrested, many having also been attacked with high-pressure hoses and police dogs. Dr. Valda Montgomery told us the work of her father, a pharmacist, in quietly organizing a massive taxi service during the crucial Montgomery bus boycott. And Ms. Joanne Bland of the Selma Interpretive Center, who by age 11 had been arrested 13 times, graphically described that “Bloody Sunday” march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in which she was a participant.

We also visited several important museums, including the National Legacy Museum in Montgomery, dedicated to the compelling argument that much of the prison system in the United States was shaped as an effort to extend slavery in another form, and that our present criminal justice system continues in injustice: in 2017, approximately 27% of all persons arrested were “black or African American,” while at the end of that year 476,000 prisoners were black, and 436,000 white. But the single most powerful experience of our five days for me was the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, sometimes called the “Lynching Museum,” also in Montgomery, to which I referred at the start of this brief essay.

I thank God for these experiences, for Fr. Shobe leading us in prayer and worship, for quiet conversations along the way. I give thanks for Rev. Waters, part of whose calling is to lead groups such as ours, and without whom our trip would have been significantly less rich. I want to thank my fellow-travelers Bill and Peggy Kwoka, whose fine notes on our journey helped spur my memories, and filled out many details which I had lost. But most powerfully, I’m grateful to be part of a community willing to continue to struggle with being the Body of Christ in the world, and which actually strives to exist for the sake of those outside its walls, to “grow up into the full measure of Christ.”

*Episcopal seminarian Jonathan Myrick Daniels heard Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s call to go to Alabama to help register people to vote. Daniels was martyred on August 20, 1965 in Hayneville, AL, when he stepped in front of a loaded shotgun to save the life of teenager Ruby Sales. Daniels is commemorated every year with a pilgrimage to the place of his murder, the jail cell which held him prior to his death, and the courthouse where his killer was exonerated. This passage from Isaiah inspired Daniels’ action. (Photo credit Bridget Reeves Tytler) . Read more in "Outside Agitator: Jon Daniels and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama" by Charles W. Eagles or watch "The Granite Saint: The Story of Jonathan Daniels" on www.wmur.com. EPF will participate in this pilgrimage this August.
Jonathan Myrick Daniels icon hangs in the chancel at
St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
LOOKING FORWARD TO
EPF’S NEXT YEAR OF ACTION EVENT!
The next stop on EPF’s 80th Anniversary Year of Action will be in Alabama. Join us August 9-10, 2019 in Montgomery for our pilgrimage to the The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and The Legacy Museum (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org) followed by the annual Jonathan Myrick Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville, Lowndes County, Alabama, sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama and the Episcopal Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast.
Some holy spaces have stained glass; St. Mark’s – Raleigh NC has this luminous woven tapestry as a center piece. Saxophone and piano accompanied our recessional, "Lift Every Voice and Sing" which never fails to remind me that worship is supposed to empower and embolden us to action.
This week, I worshipped at St. Mark’s, Raleigh, NC, with my collaborative lawyer friend, John Sarratt. St. Mark’s is a former EPF Peace Partner Parish with a long, steady tradition of social justice ministry. It was nice to have a chance to connect with so many people who already understand what EPF is all about! I also had the chance to attend the World Refugee Day event held in Central Park in Durham, NC with EPF PIN stalwart Donna Hicks. Topping off my time in central North Carolina was a brief visit with Ethan Vesely-Flad, who is about to take a year long sabbatical to Ghana and West Africa. Ethan has been invaluable in connecting this EPF newcomer to several social justice allies. Godspeed, Ethan, to you and your family!
Entryway to St. Mark’s peaceful columbarium, Raleigh, NC
Advocacy against drone warfare
EPF is participating in this important work — learning to advocate against drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. We have one committed volunteer — Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ. Are you Interested in this opportunity? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow
Mark your calendars now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorials on Friday, then participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage on Saturday. More details (including our entry times to the Lynching Memorials) and registration coming soon, so watch this space!
Thanks to Steve France of our EPF Palestine Israel Network for this announcement:

The extreme, right-wing, Fundamentalist Christian Zionists of "Christians United for Israel" are coming July 7-9 in their thousands for their annual "Washington Summit" at the Convention Center. Their mission: place heavy constituent pressure on Congress to ramp up support for even harsher (indeed apocalyptic) policies against the Palestinians.

BUT for the first time, CUFI will be met by an unprecedented, highly organized protest from Christians, Muslims and Jews — and all who support Palestinian rights. Among Christians, we who believe that the Gospel calls on us to pursue justice for all, peace, brotherhood, and respect for the dignity of all people must not be silent. Church-based supporters of Palestinian rights must raise our voices — nonviolently, faithfully, AND BOLDLY.

The protest is being organized by Friends of Sabeel North America, with the active support of Jewish Voice for Peace and American Muslims for Palestine. EPF-PIN has endorsed the action and has tasked DC members to help with preparations. FOSNA is urging people to register on their website (fosna.org) so as to ensure that this action, which is just the start of a long-term, national campaign to expose and oppose CUFI, will be a model of tolerance, restraint and seriousness.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
June 29: 20th Annual Starvin’ for Justice Fast and Vigil, Washington, DC
June 30: Washington Episcopal Holy Land Committee
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 13: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI
July 14: St. Thomas, Battle Creek, MI
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Chicago, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day, St. James, Essex Junction
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
EPF is gathering a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, immediately following the Province V Big Provincial Meeting in Kalamazoo. Time is 4:00 pm on Saturday, July 13, at the corner of Division and Michigan Avenue in Battle Creek. A light picnic will follow a time of remembrance and prayers. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20. Photo credit Rob Burgess.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (home or church parking lot appreciated)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
A black bear visits the back yard of Ginny and Bill Pierson,
aptly named "Peaceful Hollow"
where Steven, Miranda and I had the pleasure of staying while in Asheville.
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Three
EPF CHAPTER OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA:
FAITHFUL, NON-VIOLENT WAR RESISTERS
This week took us from Winston-Salem, through Boone, Conover, and Hendersonville into Asheville, North Carolina. I was welcomed by our EPF Chapter of Western North Carolina at the glorious Cathedral of All Souls on Sunday afternoon for a mutual pep-rally, of sorts.

Like our EPF national organization, EPF-WNC was born of war-protest. After the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, the chapter organized and began a ten year vigil on the lawn of the Cathedral, which is conspicuous outside the entrance to the Biltmore House, holding signs in opposition to the war, including encouragement to "Pray for Peace and Justice." To bring the message of peace and justice into the lives of the congregation and community more deeply, the chapter has also sponsored lectures on gun control, abolition of capital punishment, non-violence, The Innocence Project, and environmental concerns. More recently, encouraging others to register to vote and then to vote consistently with their baptismal promises has been a priority, as have ongoing efforts to feed the hungry. The chapter and All Souls are primary sponsors of "Loving Food Resources" (grocery bag pictured above), which has, for 25 years, provided basic needs for people living with HIV/AIDS and persons in Home Hospice care. More than 80 people utilize the pantry each week. Learn more at www.lovingfood.org.

One of the chapter’s conveners is the Very Rev. Ross Jones, former dean of St. George’s College in Jerusalem. Fr. Ross and his wife, Gwen, have connected the chapter intimately to the issues of our Palestine-Israel Network, and much of our time together on Sunday was spent lamenting the current state of affairs in Palestine and catching up on the good work and organizing efforts of our PIN Action Group.

I left inspired, knowing that social justice work in North Carolina is in capable, caring hearts and hands!

Cathedral of All Souls, Asheville, NC
Peacock banner at All Souls Cathedral suggests the beautiful power of transformation.
Join EPF members from around the country, including Jack and Chris Payden-Travers of St. Anne’s, Winston-Salem, and me for the annual Fast and Vigil to abolish the death penalty, June 29-July 2, in Washington, DC. Details at www.abolition.org.
Mark your calendars now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorials on Friday, then participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage on Saturday. More details and registration coming soon, so watch this space!
Advocacy against drone warfare
EPF is participating in this important work — learning to advocate against drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. EPF member Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ is planning to attend — are you Interested in this ministry? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow
Our Ithica, New York, Area Episcopal Peace Fellowship
reports an amazing and inspiring event held last week:

EQUALITY, FREEDOM, JUSTICE, AND PEACE FOR ALL IN ISRAEL /PALESTINE: An interfaith conversation between Mother Megan Castellan, St. John’s Episcopal Church, and Rabbi Brian Walt, Congregation Tikkun v’Or; moderated by Laura Branca, Dorothy Cotton Institute was held on Thursday, June 13, at St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Mother Megan and Rabbi Brian share a commitment to work toward an equitable and just resolution to the ongoing and worsening crisis in Israel/Palestine. Their commitment is rooted in their respective faiths and based on their personal experiences and witness in Israel/Palestine. They shared how they—as a rabbi and a priest—understand what they have observed and why this calling is central to their spiritual and ethical commitments. Their conversation was inspiring and edifying.

The event was organized by Ithaca Jewish Voice for Peace/Committee for Justice in Palestine and the Ithaca Area Episcopal Peace Fellowship, and was co- sponsored by St. John’s Episcopal Church, Dorothy Cotton Institute, Congregation Tikkun v’Or, Ithaca Area Congregations Together, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Church of the Epiphany, Ithaca Interfaith Center for Action and Healing, Group 73 of Amnesty International, Ithaca Catholic Worker and others.

Thanks to EPF PIN Convenor Linda Gaither for this news.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Steven, Miranda and I will still be in North Carolina for the next several weeks! Are you here, too!? Let me know if you want to meet for coffee or worship!

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 23: St. Mark’s, Raleigh NC (tentative)
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 29: 20th Annual Starvin’ for Justice Fast and Vigil, Washington, DC
June 30: Washington Episcopal Holy Land Committee
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 13: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI (in the works!)
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Chicago, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day, Diocese of Vermont
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
Our special treat is a GO! EPF is gathering a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, immediately following the Province V Big Provincial Meeting in Kalamazoo. Time is 4:00 pm on Saturday, July 13, at the corner of Division and Michigan Avenue in Battle Creek. A light picnic will follow a time of remembrance and prayers. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20. Photo credit Rob Burgess.
Gorgeous garden at the home of our hosts, Ginny and Bill Pierson, Asheville, NC.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Join an EPF committee
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
STAY CONNECTED
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