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Peace Out! Week Forty-three
Members of EPF of Blair County, Pennsylvania prepare to begin their "Journey of Remembrance" Walk and Vigil in Altoona, PA on Saturday, November 2 — All Souls’ Day. From the left: Cowan Mikolajczyk, Shannon Berndt, Greg Williams, Woody Pyeatt, Marilyn Pyeatt, Yoseph Widirahmaya and David Wirick.
EPF Walks and Prays for
Victims of Gun Violence

Holy God, open our eyes to a fresh vision
for a peaceful world,
along with the will
to seek alternatives to revenge and violence.

EPF of Blair County, PA sponsored a two part ecumenical "Journey of Remembrance" on All Souls’ Day, Saturday, November 2, to honor those who have been the victims of gun violence, and to offer comfort to those who have suffered loss due to gun violence. There was a short walk from the Wehnwood United Methodist Church in Altoona to the Edith Davis Eve Memorial Chapel at Penn State-Altoona, punctuated by brief stops for prayer and the lighting of candles to honor the victims of suicide, armed conflicts and wars, mass shootings, accidental shootings, school shootings, other murders and domestic violence. The Vigil at the chapel gave participants the solemn moment to light candles for victims they had known personally. Later that evening, a memorial service was held at St. Luke’s-Altoona, the parish home of many of the Blair County EPF-ers. The afternoon was a holy opportunity for EPF to shine a spotlight on the waste and lingering effects of the senseless gun violence in our culture.

On Sunday, I had the joy of worshiping with St. Luke’s-Altoona. A delicious mostly vegan luncheon reception followed. In this entire year of traveling for EPF, I have not before had the chance to worship with a congregation which was almost entirely comprised of EPF members. It’s a small, deeply dedicated group who take their baptismal covenants very seriously. I was heartened to know that some of the leftovers from our luncheon would be served again later that day, when the "Becoming Beloved Community" workshop, led by Kevin Barron, was going to be held. We had a chance to talk about how racism and white supremacy, which, of course, is the work of "Becoming Beloved," is the sin which undergirds all of the other social ills of violence which EPF advocates against — gun violence, environmental injustice, income inequality, the death penalty, to name a few — and how important that work is to making a just world a reality.

I’ll give a special shout out to Shannon Berndt, who so many of you know as the friendly voice of EPF Member Services and the Palestine Israel Network’s administrative support, who invited me for this visit. Thanks for having me, Shannon, and for all you do for me and EPF and PIN. You bless us with your service and love!

Shannon Berndt and me, back in January of this year, when she came to Birmingham to train me on the administrative jobs of EPF. We stopped for this photo along the Civil Rights trail in downtown Birmingham, where markers have been placed to draw attention to the historic events of the Civil Rights Movement which transpired there.
Father Bob Appeal
An invitation from
EPF NEC Chair,
Rev. Bob Davidson
Year of Action Celebrations in
Bristol and Providence,
Rhode Island!
THIS WEEK!
EPF
80th Anniversary Commemoration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rt. Rev. Shannon MacVean-Brown
Bishop of Vermont
Celebrant: Rt. Rev. Nicholas Knisely
Bishop of Rhode Island


Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Caribbean Soul Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019, Vice President,
House of Deputies, The Episcopal Church

Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
Student rates:
Sunday Fundraiser: $35
Monday events including lunch: $10
All events Sunday and Monday: $40

https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry, congratulates Episcopal Peace Fellowship on 80 years
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Nov. 9-11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Steven and I are planning to spend the winter in the southwest, heading up through California and then into Oregon and Washington. We will come back east in time for our NEC meeting in Detroit in April, 2020. To schedule a visit, contact me at epfactnow.

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Look up! Inside the chapel at Penn State, Altoona, where Bair County, EPF held its moving "Journey of Remembrance" Vigil in honor of victims of gun violence
 on All Souls’ Day.
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Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out! Weeks Forty-one and Forty-two
NEC members at St. Timothy’s, Littleton, CO at the April, 2019 NEC meeting: Rev. Bob Davidson, Rev. Kay Houck, Bob Lotz, Melanie Atha, Maryann Philbrook and Ellen Lindeen
Renewing the Vision of EPF
As We Turn 80
By Rev. Bob Davidson, Chair, EPF National Executive Council

I will pour out my spirit on all flesh;
your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,
your old men shall dream dreams,
and your young men shall see visions.

The prophet Joel rang through our Episcopal parishes this past Sunday just as the National Executive Council was preparing to gather in Providence, Rhode Island to celebrate the 80th Anniversary of the founding of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship on November 11 (Armistice Day), 1939.

Within EPF are sons and daughters who have relentlessly chosen to dream dreams and see visions of the new creation where another prophet, Isaiah proclaimed, “They will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation will not take up sword against nation, nor will they train for war anymore”.

It is not enough for the Episcopal Peace Fellowship to proudly claim 80 years of inspired witness to the vision of our founders who stood strong in a nation healing from the “war to end all wars” to provide a safe haven for those conscientiously opposing war. This vision for 80 years has prophetically spoken to a church and a world often bent on fanning the flames of white supremacy and privilege, sanctioning state sponsored violence, and equating blind patriotism with love of country and faith.

It is not enough for the Episcopal Peace Fellowship to lift up to the church and the world models of members and Chapters and Peace Partner parishes who live out our mission to do justice, dismantle violence and strive to be peacemakers.

It is not enough that for 80 years EPF has worked to engage young adults to create the next generation of peacemakers through pilgrimages and a presence at the last 6 General Conventions. For 80 years EPF has tirelessly resisted gun violence and its earlier forms now with an Action Group leading our witness through advocacy, public witness and partnering with other GVP groups. For 80 years the commitment of EPF to abolish capital punishment has captured the energies of countless members to stand vigil, to give testimony and to cast light on the blatant racism of those sentencing people to death. For 80 years EPF has mobilized its members and chapters, now through the Palestine Israel Network, to humanize communities and persons as brothers and sisters within occupied areas targeted with our own nation’s complicity to marginalize and colonize in Palestine and regions of the Middle East. For 80 years EPF has been guided by a vision to unwaveringly illuminate the underlying justification for corporate, community and relationship violence to be spawned from racism and poverty which has marked this year’s anniversary commemoration pilgrimage for racial reconciliation.

As the national chair of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship, I call on all of our membership, any who are committed to the work of peace and justice and those who claim a relationship with the Episcopal Church to renew a NEW VISION for this beloved organization. Where might we be called to DO JUSTICE now in this time of injustice and inequity? Where would you encourage EPF to DISMANTLE VIOLENCE in a time when children fear going to school and refugees are turned back from our borders to face certain death in their homeland? As we STRIVE TO BE PEACEMAKERS what vision would you bring that will propel our work in the next years of our existence.

May this November 11th cause us to be discontent and indignant rather than restful and satisfied with where we’ve come in our history. Join with the leadership of the National Executive Council and those coming for our Pilgrimage Toward Racial Reconciliation in Providence, Rhode Island. If you are unable to be there in person, I urge you to support our work with your prayer and gifts at: https://www.classy.org/event/year-of-action-pilgrimage-for-racial-reconciliation/e249556

Father Bob Appeal
An invitation from
EPF NEC Chair,
Rev. Bob Davidson
Year of Action Celebrations in
Bristol and Providence,
Rhode Island!
EPF
80th Anniversary Commemoration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rt. Rev. Shannon MacVean-Brown
Bishop of Vermont
Celebrant: Rt. Rev. Nicholas Knisely
Bishop of Rhode Island


Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Swing Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019, Vice President,
House of Deputies, The Episcopal Church

Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
Student rates:
Sunday Fundraiser: $35
Monday events including lunch: $10
All events Sunday and Monday: $40

https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry, congratulates Episcopal Peace Fellowship on 80 years
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Condolences

It is with great sadness that EPF shares the news of the death of member Thomas G. Bias. Thomas, of Flanders, NJ died peacefully at home following a long illness on October 17, 2019 surrounded by his wife and daughter. He is survived by his wife, Linda Bryk, also of Flanders, NJ; his daughter, Fiona Kyle, of Astoria, NY; his younger sister, Nancy Nicholson, of Towson, MD; and his younger brother, George Bias, of Maricopa, AZ. Thomas was predeceased by his first daughter, Sarah Bryk-Bias, and his parents, Guy and Wilma Bias. Our prayers are will all who love him.

Thomas was born in January 1950 in Tulsa, OK. His family left in 1952 and eventually settled in Baltimore, MD where he grew up. He attended the Gilman School in Baltimore and graduated in 1967. In his high school years, he tutored at-risk youth in English and saw first-hand the tribulations they faced, which permanently affected him. Thomas then attended Amherst College in MA, where he graduated with a BA in English Literature in 1971. It was at college that his political activism was ignited, and he tore through the library to learn about issues regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. That led him to discover Socialism and set him on a path he would follow for the rest of his life.

Thomas was a lifelong activist and political organizer. He was strongly anti-war and first worked to protest the Vietnam War and continued to oppose and protest all wars that followed. He was a stalwart believer in mankind, peace and justice, and in God. In college, he joined the Young Socialist Alliance and was invited to join the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) after moving to New York City. He remained with the SWP until 1979, and later joined the Fourth Internationalist Tendency (FIT). In 2010, he helped develop what became known as the Labor Fightback Network and was active with them until shortly before he passed. In 2014, he returned to the Episcopal church of his youth.

Inspired by his Oklahoma heritage, and other native son Woody Guthrie, he picked up the 12-string guitar in 1963. He played and sang throughout his life, and it brought him and others great joy. He sang with various groups including The Solidarity Singers of the NJ IUC, and was the organist and choir director of St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church in Succasunna, NJ. He was proud of the songs that he wrote to speak up against injustice as well as the poetry he wrote in his youth. His songs will be a testament to his beliefs and will leave a legacy of hope for the future of the working class.

Thomas began working as a printer in the typographical trade in 1971. He was a proud member of the International Typographical Union. He worked at Arrow Typographers in Newark, NJ for fourteen years and also worked with other typesetting companies, specializing in foreign languages. Until recently, he worked as a Legal Secretary with Bennet D. Zurofsky, Attorney at Law, previously of Newark, NJ. Tom asked that any memorials be made to Episcopal Peace Fellowship: https://give.classy.org/giveEPF

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Nov. 2-3: St. Luke’s, Altoona, PA

Nov. 9-11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Steven and I are planning to spend the winter in the southwest, heading up through California and then into Oregon and Washington. We will come back east in time for our NEC meeting in Detroit in April, 2020. To schedule a visit, contact me at epfactnow.

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

View of Hebron, Palestine, as seen from
the offices of Youth Against Settlements
(more on my pilgrimage to Palestine in the coming weeks)
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Peace Out! Week Forty
St. Savior Episcopal Church, Bar Harbor, Maine
New England in autumn is evidence
of God’s good grace.

Greetings, EPF friends and family! I’m in the Holy Land this week, about as far away from the grandeur of New England in October as one can get, yet spectacular in a quite different way. I look forward to sharing my experiences here with you when I return. As I was preparing to leave, and while I am here, I have been reflecting on the hostilities in Syria, and offer this, gifted to me by EPF stalwart Bill Sloan in Pensacola:

Justice soothes.
Justice heals the wounds and sores in the social body.
Justice strikes down all robbery — illegal and legal.
Justice calms.
Injustice stings.
Injustice burns, irritates — kills sociability and creates conflict.
Injustice is unsocial — antisocial — and is thus a social sore.
Injustice prevents brotherhood.
Injustice, organized in justice, is the soul of all class-labor forms of society.
The purpose of all class-labor forms of society is robbery.
The robbed resist – sometimes
The robbers are ready for resistance – always.
In all class-labor forms of society, the ruling class always have:

First, an armed guard — ready:
ready to serve as tusk and fist for the robber ruling class
ready to suppress protesting chattel-slaves
ready to suppress protesting surfs
ready to suppress protesting wage earners
ready to defend the class-labor system
ready to extend the class-labor system
ready to defy and defeat and hold down and kick the robbed working class.

Second, an unarmed guard — composed of prideless purchasable human things, social chameleons, moral eunuchs, political flunkies — intellectual prostitutes — ready:
ready to make laws in the interest of the ruling class
ready to interpret laws in the interest of the ruling class
ready to execute laws in the interest of the ruling class
ready to cunningly cajole and beguile the toil cursed working class
ready to cunningly teach meekness, humility and contentment to the working class
ready to cunningly teach servility and obedience to the working class
ready with grand words to cunningly dupe and chloroform the working class
ready to bellow about "Law and Order" when the unemployed call loudly for work or bread and when hungry strikers open their lips in self defense
ready "for Jesus’ sake" (and a salary) to glorify war and scream to the "God of Battles" (also the "God of Peace") for victory; ready to baptize wholesale murder and flatter the blood stained conquerers; ready to whine and mumble over the shell torn corpses of the victims and hypocritically sniffle and mouth consolatory congratulations to the war cursed widows and orphans — ready thus to mock their own ruined victims — for a price; ready to preach — to the workers — that they must fight like hell to "get a home in heaven."

From the preface to "War – What For?" by George R. Kirkpatrick, published in 1910.

Father Bob Appeal
An invitation from
EPF NEC Chair,
Rev. Bob Davidson
Year of Action Celebrations in
Bristol and Providence,
Rhode Island!
EPF
80th Anniversary Commemoration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rt. Rev. Shannon MacVean-Brown
Bishop of Vermont
Celebrant: Rt. Rev. Nicholas Knisely
Bishop of Rhode Island

Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Swing Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019
Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday Events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry, congratulates Episcopal Peace Fellowship on 80 years
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Seven people charged with breaking into the Kings Bay Naval Base to protest nuclear weapons will face trial Oct. 21 for their action. One of the defendants is Dorothy Day’s granddaughter. Read the full story here: https://cruxnow.com/church-in-the-usa/2019/08/31/kings-bay-plowshares-trial-for-nuclear-weapons-protest-set-for-october/
The North Dallas chapter of the EPF meets on the first Sunday of each month at the Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration in Dallas to write to their elected representatives, calling it their "Peace Post." If you are in the area, please join them. If you’re elsewhere, consider doing something similar in your own congregation, to build a community of peace workers.
From the Oct. 7 Peace Post info packet, shared with us by Ron Damholt of North Dallas EPF: "Today we’re suggesting three possible issues: wording in the National Defense Authorization Act designed to prevent war with Iran, and to end US support of the Saudi bombing of Yemen; reauthorization of a version of the Violence Against Women Act which would include strong provisions for the protection of Native American women; and the proposed limitation of refugees to 18,000 in FY 2020, the ‘lowest number in the history of the modern refugee program’ in the United States." Read the full Peace Post packet here.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Oct. 11-24: Palestine

Nov. 2-3: St. Luke’s, Altoona, PA

Nov. 9-11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Steven and I are planning to spend the winter in the southwest, heading up through California and then into Oregon and Washington. We will come back east in time for our NEC meeting in Detroit in April, 2020. To schedule a visit, contact me at epfactnow.

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Along the Kancamagus Highway near Lincoln, NH
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-Nine
EPF participated in the Interfaith Network on Drone Warfare in Princeton, New Jersey, September 27-29. Full report from our EPF delegates appears below. Don’t miss out on this chance to get in on the ground floor on this important nonviolence initiative. Shown here are the Episcopalians at the conference: top row from left: Bob Lotz, EPF delegate and Secretary to the EPF National Executive Council; Tim Miller; and Allie Graham, EPF delegate. Seated are Mary Neznek and Pauline Muchina.
A report from the field on the Interfaith Network on Drone Warfare Conference
By Allie Graham and Bob Lotz, EPF delegates

The lethal use of remote-controlled pilotless aircrafts was the topic of a lively three-day conference of the Interfaith Network on Drone Warfare held at the Erdman Center of the Princeton Theological Seminary in late September. Nearly 80 attendees from over 15 faith traditions, including Roman Catholicism, several Protestant denominations, prominently the United Church of Christ, Sikhism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam (and five Episcopalians), and 24 states plus D.C. discussed the ways in which armed drones are being used in military contexts, attacking both military and civilian targets and creating lasting damage to both victim and remote pilot.

Drone warfare seems like a great idea to the Pentagon and many in government, because it offers a technological way to get around the touchy issue of putting “boots on the ground.” One presenter told of visiting a Congressional office to talk about the downside of drone warfare, only to be asked, “What? There’s a downside?” Since there’s no direct human contact between a drone pilot in Nevada or Iowa or central New York state, and an “enemy,” drones avoid some objections to US involvement in foreign wars and conflicts. In fact, this is precisely the moral hazard that people of faith must deal with – war that has no body bags coming home, that only kills “others,” people of color and many if not mostly civilians. As people who have a commitment through our various faiths to love our neighbors and work for peace among all peoples, we cannot let this go unchallenged.

The Washington, DC-based Interfaith Working Group on Drone Warfare, a partner in the INDW, asks three things of the US Government:

· End the CIA’s authority to carry out drone strikes; if there must be drones, they must be under the more transparent Dept of Defense control.

· Maintain meaningful human control over lethal weapons; no autonomous, algorithm-based targeting.

· Study the long-term impact of drone warfare on social stability in target countries and perceptions of their civilians about US role. Are we creating more terrorists?

The INDW has made several half-hour videos which are available for individuals and congregations, along with other materials at interfaithdronenetwork.org.

Through films, lectures, panel presentations, handouts, and workshops, conference attendees learned ways to better understand the issues surrounding drone warfare, why it is of specific concern to people of faith, and ways to advocate towards an end to these programs.

If you are interested in joining the campaign to end drone warfare, or would like to learn more, please let us know. The EPF would like to have an action group working on this project.

Bob Lotz,
Convener for Gun Violence Prevention,
Episcopal Peace Fellowship
810.488.6458 (cell)
bob.lotz.epf

Father Bob Appeal
An invitation from
EPF NEC Chair,
Rev. Bob Davidson
Year of Action Celebrations in
Bristol and Providence,
Rhode Island!
EPF
80th Anniversary Commemoration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rt. Rev. Shannon MacVean-Brown
Bishop of Vermont

Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Swing Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019
Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday Events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry, congratulates Episcopal Peace Fellowship on 80 years
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Condolences

It is with great sadness that EPF announces that Rev. Ronald Miller, husband of former EPF Executive Director, Mary Miller, a retired priest in the Diocese of Maryland, died on September 30, aged 83. Ron served many congregations in Baltimore including St. Mary the Virgin, Church of the Advent, St. James’, Lafayette Square, and St. Bartholomew’s. He also served for a period on diocesan staff, and more recently sang in the choir at the Cathedral. His ordained ministry spanned over 55 years in the dioceses of Washington, DC, Pittsburgh and Maryland. Mary died last September. Please keep Mary and Ron’s son,Timothy, in your prayers. Ron’s memorial service will be on Thursday, October 17 at 10:00 a.m. at the Cathedral of the Incarnation, 4 East University Parkway, Baltimore, MD 21218. The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry, presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church, will preach, and the Right Rev. Eugene Taylor Sutton, Bishop of Maryland, will celebrate. Clergy who would like to process should arrive by 9:30 a.m. and wear white stoles.

If you are in the Cleveland, Ohio, area and care deeply about abolition of the death penalty, this opportunity, co-sponsored by our EPF Chapter at Trinity Cathedral, is for you.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Oct. 12-24: Palestine

Nov. 2-3: St. Luke’s, Altoona, PA

Nov. 9-11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Steven and I are planning to spend the winter in the southwest, heading up through California and then into Oregon and Washington. We will come back east in time for our NEC meeting in Detroit in April, 2020. To schedule a visit, contact me at epfactnow.

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Sunrise over Penobscot Bay, Maine
"This world is your world. Take it easy, but take it." Woody Guthrie
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-Eight
Church of Our Savior, Killington, Vermont
It has to be the only parish of its kind: Church of our Savior at Mission Farm in Killington, VT, is an active Episcopal parish church, a working farm, 172 acres of mountainous beauty set on the Ottauquechee River, which includes a vicarage, the Heminway Guest House (a fifteen person retreat center), a weekly seasonal farmer’s market, a bakery, and miles of scenic hiking trails. Read more at www.oursaviorepiscopalvt.org to see what this Eden has to offer.

But that’s not the best of it: long time EPF members Rev. Lee Alison Crawford is Vicar of COS, and her partner, Anne Brown, also an EPF-er, were eager for me to share EPF’s message of social justice with the congregation. Though Lee was freshly home from the consecration of Rt. Rev. Shannon MacVean-Brown as the 11th Bishop of Vermont, where she served as one of the Masters of Ceremony for the consecration, she and Anne made time to introduce me to the parish and the grounds and gave me an opportunity to share the message of our 80 years of action during the 9:30 Eucharist, just before Steven and I were encouraged to help ourselves to the bounty of the apple orchard. The Holy Spirit has a lovely home here in the Green Mountains. (Photo credit Steven Atha.)

On Wednesday, September 25, EPF was pleased to be a sponsor of the rally to end gun violence on the west lawn of the Capitol in Washington, DC. Hundreds gathered to say, "Enough!" to the plague of gun violence in our country and to the lack of political will in our elected leadership to enact change that will keep us and our children safe. (Photo credit Tom Johnson)
EPF participated in the Interfaith Network on Drone Warfare in Princeton, New Jersey, September 27-29. We will have a full report from our EPF delegate, Allie Graham of Princeton in next week’s "Peace Out". Don’t miss out on this chance to get in on the ground floor on this important nonviolence initiative. Shown here are the Episcopalians at the conference: top row from left: Bob Lotz, EPF delegate and Secretary to the EPF National Executive Council; Tim Miller; and Allie Graham, EPF delegate. Seated are Mary Neznek and Pauline Muchina.
Finally, the Year of Action event
we’ve been waiting for is near!
EPF
80th Anniversary Celebration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church,
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rev. Dr. Shannon MacVean Brown
Bishop-Elect of Vermont

Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Swing Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019
Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday Events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

If you are in the Cleveland, Ohio, area and care deeply about abolition of the death penalty, this opportunity, co-sponsored by our EPF Chapter at Trinity Cathedral, is for you.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Oct. 12-24: Palestine

Nov. 2: St. Luke’s, Altoona, PA

Nov. 9-11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Steven and I are planning to spend the winter in the southwest, heading up through California and then into Oregon and Washington. We will come back east in time for our NEC meeting in Detroit in April, 2020. To schedule a visit, contact me at epfactnow.

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Altar and stained glass at Church of Our Savior, Killington, Vermont
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-Seven
Christ’s Church in Rye, New York
welcomes EPF’s message
of justice and non-violence!
NEC member Rev. Michael Kurth, Curate at Christ’s Church, Rye, New York, graciously welcomed us for worship and coffee hour on Sunday, September 22. Christ’s Church will celebrate 325 years in 2020, and is discerning its holy purpose into the future, including what potential for transformative outreach might be theirs. From the enthusiasm we met amongst parishioners at coffee hour, we hope that this audacious, innovative, dedicated and generous parish will find the energy for EPF and its social justice ministries as they pray and reflect on their baptismal call.
Climate Strike in New York, as elsewhere around the globe, was well attended by inspiring school children and concerned adults on Friday, September 20. Steven Atha captured the scene in New York with scores of photographs which can be viewed at http://www.missingpersonsrv.com/travel-journal/georgetown-maine-summit-new-jersey-and-new-york-new-york
Equal Justice Initiative (www.eji.org) turns 30 this year, and I was treated to an evening in celebration of that milestone by my dear friend, Diana Kyser, at the Marriott Marquis in Manhattan. EJI founder Bryan Stevenson recognized two former convicts who were convicted as children — Donald Brown of Alabama (incarcerated for 42 years) and August Williams of Louisiana (incarcerated for 49 years)– for whom EJI secured release with landmark rulings from the U. S. Supreme Court banning the extreme punishment of children, often tried as adults. Soprano Brandie Sutton of the New York City Opera offered a moving rendition of the spiritual "Keep Your Hand on the Plow – Hold On." It was an inspiring evening. EJI does such amazing work — from saving individuals from unjust punishment to creating the institutions that will lead to change in our harsh criminal justice system — taking a moment to reflect on what they have been able to do, and what is left to be done, was time well spent. We will do the same for EPF’s 80th anniversary in Rhode Island in November, where we will have a signed copy of Stevenson’s book "Just Mercy" available at our silent action (see details below) along with tickets to the EJI National Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, AL, among much else.
Finally, the Year of Action event
we’ve been waiting for is near!
EPF
80th Anniversary Celebration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church,
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rev. Dr. Shannon MacVean Brown
Bishop-Elect of Vermont

Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Swing Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019
Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday Events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

TODAY!!!! EPF is pleased to be a sponsor of this rally to end gun violence. Join us and say, "Enough" to the plague of gun violence in our country and to the lack of political will in our elected leadership to enact change that will keep us and our children safe. We are grateful for our EPF members in the Washington, DC, area, who are dedicated to supporting this event and encouraging others to attend. We are reminded to wear black to this event in memory of lives lost to gun violence.
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

EPF Leadership Opportunity!

Are you interested in serving EPF on its National Executive Council(NEC)? Let us hear from you, and we will provide you with an application. (epfactnow). This is a three year obligation. After three years of service, you will be eligible to be re-elected to serve for another three year term. Accepting this nomination means that you would be responsible for the following, should you be elected to serve by the current members of the NEC:

+ Pray, study, act. You agree to follow and exemplify EPFs mission through living into your baptismal covenant to strive for justice and peace and to respect the dignity of every person.

+ Participation. The NEC meets twice each year, in person. You would agree to attend these meetings and be available for such virtual meetings as are needed from time to time during your term of service.

+ Committees. EPF and the NEC have four committees: membership, sustainability, programming and communications. You will agree to serve on one committee and to be in regular contact with other committee members to accomplish the purposes of the committee and EPF.

+ Development. You will agree to promote EPF’s financial, membership and organizational development, on local, regional and national level. You agree to contribute money to EPF every month at a level which is compatible with your personal situation.

+ Nonviolence. You agree to seek ways of resolving conflict in nonviolent ways, and to promote peace, justice and nonviolence in your personal, professional and spiritual life

+. Stewardship. You will be a good steward of EPF through careful decisions about programs, finances and policy.

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ (Bob Lotz and Allie Graham attending on our behalf)

Sept. 29: Church of our Savior, Killington, VT

Oct. 12-24: Palestine

Nov. 2: St. Luke’s, Altoona, PA

Nov. 9-11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Someone in EPF national leadership is eager to be with you during our 80 days! epfactnow

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Refreshing view of Staffordville Lake, Stafford Springs, Connecticut
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-Six
EPF Maine celebrates
in style at Grace!
On Sunday, September 15, EPF-Maine hosted us at Grace-Bath for worship, then afterwards for conversation and refreshments by the fireside in the lovely Tubbs Hall. This EPF chapter is deeply dedicated to work on the issues of our Palestine-Israel Network Action Group, in large measure by reason of the presence of Rev. Bob and Maurine Tobin — the inaugural Cotton Fite award winners — in their midst for so many years. The group is active in drafting legislation for their Diocesan Convention on issues other than PIN as well. These issues include gun violence prevention, denouncing "as morally and ethically objectionable, spurious arguments designed to thwart remedial action (on gun violence prevention), including contentions that… ‘gun rights’ under the U S Constitution are paramount even over the Common Good of our communities, and the lives of innocents." Thanks, EPF-Mainers, for making these issues a priority for your holy work!

PIN member and EPF stalwart John Heermans and his wife, Cecelia Polansky, joined us for worship and fellowship, driving over from St. James–Essex Junction, VT. If you are in Vermont, New Hampshire or Maine and wish to be an advocate for justice in the Holy Land, please contact John at heermansjg as he is coordinating efforts in New England.

Former EPF-Maine convenor Diane Paterson, who along with her husband, Jim, graciously hosted Steven and me for our several days in Bath and Georgetown, Maine, offers us this lovely reminder of what peace is supposed to be:

"Peace has come to mean the time when there aren’t any wars or even when there aren’t any major wars. Beggars can’t be choosers; we’d most of us settle for that. But in Hebrew peace, shalom, means fullness, means having everything you need to be wholly and happily yourself.

"One of the titles by which Jesus is known is Prince of Peace, and he used the word himself in what seem at first glance to be two radically contradictory utterances. On one occasion he said to the disciples, "Do not think that I have come to bring peace on earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword" (Matthew 10:34). And later on, the last time they ate together, he said to them, "Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you" (John 14:27).

"The contradiction is resolved when you realize that, for Jesus, peace seems to have meant not the absence of struggle, but the presence of love."

Frederick Buechner, from "Wishful Thinking"

After a "fireside chat" at Grace-Bath, EPF-Maine members enjoyed a hearty "lobstah" lunch at Taste of Maine in Bath. Present, from front left of table to the right front of table: Steven Atha, Rev. Dr. Ted Gaiser (rector: Grace-Bath), Judy Smart (recorder-elect EPF-Maine, Grace-Bath), Diane Paterson (convenor EPF-Maine, Grace-Bath) Cindy Widmaier, Melanie Atha, Colleen Stevens (convenor-elect EPF-Maine, Grace-Bath) and Kathleen Reed (treasurer EPF-Maine, St. Andrew’s-Winthrop, ME).
Finally, the Year of Action event
we’ve been waiting for is near!
EPF
80th Anniversary Celebration!

Sunday, November 10, 2019
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church,
399 Hope Street
Bristol, R.I.
A Commemoration of Witness
4:30 PM Evensong
Preacher: Rev. Dr. Shannon MacVean Brown
Bishop-Elect of Vermont

Followed by A Celebration of Peace
5:30 PM Fundraiser
Swing Band, Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks,
Hors D’oeuvres & Silent Auction

Monday, November 11, 2019
Center for Reconciliation
271 North Main Street
Providence, RI

Pilgrimage
9:00 – 11:00 AM
Benefit Street’s Mile of History
walking tour
sponsored by Center for Reconciliation
Providence, RI

Lunch
11:30 – 12:30

Keynote & Panel Discussion
12:30 – 2:30 PM
Byron Rushing, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 1983-2019
Representatives of Racial Reconciliation Ministries,
Province I, ECUSA

Tickets:
Sunday Fundraiser: $60
Monday Events including lunch: $30
All events Sunday and Monday: $80
https://give.classy.org/reconciliation

EPF is pleased to be a sponsor of this rally to end gun violence. Join us and say, "Enough" to the plague of gun violence in our country and to the lack of political will in our elected leadership to enact change that will keep us and our children safe. We are grateful for our EPF members in the Washington, DC, area, who are dedicated to supporting this event and encouraging others to attend. We are reminded to wear black to this event in memory of lives lost to gun violence.
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

EPF will be striking for climate change awareness at Foley Square, 31-51 Center Street, New York, New York, noon to 5:30 pm Eastern time on Friday, September 20. This site is only steps from African Burial Ground National Monument, which we will also plan to visit. Join us and show up for our environment! Make a loud and unusual noise!

It’s not too late to organize your own strike event. Check here: www.globalclimatestrike.net and plan to attend an event near you, or plan your own community event!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Sept. 20: Climate Strike, NY, NY

Sept. 22: Christ’s Church, Rye, NY

Sept. 25: Rally against gun violence, Washington, DC

Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ

Oct. 13-24: Palestine

Nov. 2: St. Luke’s, Altoona, PA

Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Bristol and Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Someone in EPF national leadership is eager to be with you during our 80 days! epfactnow

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

View of boats on Sheepscot River in Georgetown, Maine.
Special thanks to Diane and Jim Paterson for the warm welcome,
the generous hospitality, the new friendship and the gorgeous views!
We loved every minute of our time with you!
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-five
Oh, how good and pleasant it is
When kindred live together in unity!

Psalm 133:1

The Diocese of Vermont gathered at our newest Peace Partner Parish, St. James Episcopal Church — Essex Junction, Vermont on Saturday, September 7 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. to celebrate EPF’s 80th anniversary and the Feast Day of our beloved Bishop Paul Jones. The Holy Spirit, current Bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, Rt. Rev. Tom Ely, and Bishop-Elect Rev. Dr. Shannon MacVean-Brown were on hand to bless the new Peace Pole, which was hand made by EPF PIN member John Heermans. The celebration started in bright sun, but before we could get underway the rain clouds gathered and glorious rain helped the bishops do the work of consecrating the new icon. The white cedar pole (harvested from Swanton, VT) beckons peace in eight languages, including Chinese, Russian, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew, Algonquin, English, and Celtic. Bishop Paul Jones life dates are captured on the pole as well.

The afternoon was a holy and joyful time of reflecting on the peace which the church is called to make, as well as enjoying beautiful song and music (Priest in Partnership Rev. Kim Hardy played both cello and piano during the event), thinking about the life and witness of Rt. Rev. Paul Jones, and then reciting and renewing our baptismal covenant. It was a simple and meaningful liturgy followed by a time of fellowship and delicious refreshment. St. Paul’s demonstrated how it takes a village to do Kingdom work with grace and enduring beauty.

EPF is pleased to be a sponsor of this rally to end gun violence. Join us and say, "Enough" to the plague of gun violence in our country and to the lack of political will in our elected leadership to enact change that will keep us and our children safe. We are grateful for our EPF members in the Washington, DC, area, who are dedicated to supporting this event and encouraging others to attend.
On Sunday, our precious time in the Diocese of Vermont continued at the 10:00 Eucharist at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Burlington. A striking structure virtually on the shores of Lake Champlain, built in the brutalist style, the church building is nevertheless warm and welcoming, full of the holy people of God doing the work we are called to do in all manners and sorts of ministries. We were lucky to be in attendance on Startup Sunday, and were treated to brief introductions to, and invitations to participate in, all the ways this remarkable church is serving God and neighbor. We enjoyed a picnic lunch and a celebration of twenty years of music ministry of Mark Howe, the Cathedral’s Director of Music. Vermont’s Pride Parade kicked off right outside the cathedral doors right after lunch and it was a riot of joy, protest, color and witness in a perfect New England autumn afternoon. As a final treat, John Heerman’s and his wife, Cecelia, took Steven and me to Rock Point, the Diocese of Vermont’s diocesan headquarters, for a hike on the 130 acres situated on Lake Champlain. The outdoor chapel is breathtaking, set off in the forest above the clear lake.
Outdoor chapel at Rock Point, Diocese of Vermont, with view of Lake Champlain.
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

EPF will be striking for climate change awareness at Foley Square, 31-51 Center Street, New York, New York, noon to 5:30 pm Eastern time on September 20. This site is only steps from African Burial Ground National Monument, which we will also plan to visit. Join us and show up for our environment! Make a loud and unusual noise!

It’s not too late to organize your own strike event. Check here: www.globalclimatestrike.net and plan to attend an event near you, or plan your own community event!

Calling our El Paso and other west Texas EPF peace partners:
show up for the Poor People’s Campaign!
Many opportunities and challenges in the coming days…
Next up: Grace Episcopal Church, Bath, Maine on Sunday, September 15!
Join us for a fireside visit after the 10:15 Eucharist.
See you there!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Sept. 15: Grace, Bath, ME

Sept. 20: Climate Strike, NY, NY

Sept. 25: Rally against gun violence, Washington, DC

Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ

Oct 13-24: Palestine

Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Someone in EPF national leadership is eager to be with you during our 80 days! epfactnow

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Martyred Jonathan Myrick Daniels’ memorial service was held in his hometown of Keene, New Hampshire, at St. James Episcopal Church. Steven and I took a short pilgrimage here on our way to Vermont last week.
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Peace Out! Week Thirty-four
Today is the Feast Day of Bishop Paul Jones,
a founder of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship.

In April 1918, the House of Bishops tried to silence a prominent Episcopal voice against World War I, Bishop Paul Jones. Jones, serving then-Missionary District of Utah, was forced to resign his post when he revealed his deep convictions about war, stating “I believe that the methods of modern international war are quite incompatible with the Christian principles of reconciliation and brotherhood…” However, Jones’ work for peace continued. He was a founder of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and served as its secretary for ten years. He helped found the Episcopal Peace Fellowship prior to his death in 1941. During World War II, he helped resettle Jews and others who fled Nazi Germany, and he argued for greater understanding in relations with Japan. His voice and witness are still missed, and his influence drives our ongoing commitment to non-violence. Join us in Essex Junction, Vermont, this Saturday to celebrate Bishop Jones life and prophetic vision. Details below.

"The day will come when, like slavery which was once held in good repute, war will be looked upon as thoroughly un-Christian. At present it is recognized as an evil which nobody honestly wants, but not yet has it received its final sentence at the bar of Christian morality. Only when Christian men and women and churches will be brave enough to stand openly for the full truth that their consciences are beginning to recognize, will the terrible anachronism of war . . . be done away.”

Bishop Paul Jones

Beacon Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Summit, New Jersey hangs orange origami peace cranes from their rafters, in order to commemorate the victims of gun violence in their community. Each crane has the name of a victim written on it, and each was lovingly crafted by a member of the congregation during social hour following their Sunday services. This is a lovely and impactful way to create awareness around the devastation of gun violence in our culture.
Join us in Vermont on Saturday!
Join the Diocese of Vermont at St. James Episcopal Church — Essex Junction, Vermont on Saturday, September 7 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. to celebrate EPF’s 80th anniversary and the Feast Day of our Beloved Bishop Paul Jones! Current Bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, Rt. Rev. Tom Ely will be on hand, and a new Peace Pole will be blessed and installed on the parish grounds. We hope that you can be a part of this meaningful commemoration in celebration of our founding and our decades of social justice action!
EPF is pleased to be a sponsor of this rally to end gun violence. Join us and say, "Enough" to the plague of gun violence in our country and to the lack of political will in our elected leadership to enact change that will keep us and our children safe. We are grateful for our EPF members in the Washington, DC, area, who are dedicated to supporting this event and encouraging others to attend.
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness,
declaring that our activity is,
"Nothing less than the work of God!"

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Watch this space for details on where EPF will be striking for climate change! It’s not too late to organize your own strike event. Check here: www.globalclimatestrike.net

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT

Sept. 8: The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, VT

Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME

Sept. 25: Rally against gun violence, Washington, DC

Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ

Oct 13-24: Palestine

Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Someone in EPF national leadership is eager to be with you during our 80 days! epfactnow

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Zinnias in Summit, New Jersey

"As I went walking I saw a sign there
And on the sign it said "No Trespassing!"
But on the other side, it didn’t say nothing,
That side was made for you and me."

Woody Guthrie

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Peace Out! Week Thirty-three
"First Family" portrait unveiled on Sunday at Town Hall at Fort Monroe. Depicted are Anthony and Isabella Tucker, and first born William, at Point Comfort, where the slave ship White Lion landed four hundred years ago. The ship is shown on the distant horizon, and Anthony is bearing sassafras, known for its healing properties. The unveiling kicked off the "Healing Day", the final day of the "400th Commemoration: First African Landing at Old Point Comfort, Virginia in 1619."
Hundreds of us attended the bell ringing at Fort Monroe, VA, as did many others at churches around the nation, in commemoration of the first African landing in the British colonies.
Detail, bell ringing at Fort Monroe, Virginia on Sunday, August 25, 2019.
The National Park Service
does its part to
preserve the history of
our country’s systemic racism,
and to encourage healing and
forward progress.

Steven and I found ourselves within driving distance of Fort Monroe, Virginia last week and decided to join the National Park Service’s 400th Commemoration of the First African Landing at what used to be known as Point Comfort, Virginia, in 1619. The first persons to greet us were, remarkably, fellow Episcopalians Tom and Joy Cassidy of St. Andrew’s – Arlington, VA. Tom works for the National Trust for Historic Preservation (www.savingplaces.org), so we could had done worse for early event companionship. It was a holy, hope-filled day.

The afternoon began with the portrait posted at the top of this blog, "First Family," being unveiled. The artist, J Griffin Anderson, told us that some years ago, when she had moved to Hampton, VA, she was out for a walk when an older white gentleman approached her and introduced himself. He asked for her name, and asked what she did, and when she told him she was an artist, he said that he had been having a recurring dream — that a young black woman walked into a totally white room and there painted a white lion. He proclaimed that she was the artist who would do that very thing.

The National Park Service had a weekend full of events, and Sunday was designated "healing day." After the unveiling of "First Family", four NPS superintendents took turns identifying each of the National Parks and Monuments which are dedicated to preserving the history of African Americans from slavery, through the Civil War, through reconstruction and the Jim Crow era, to the Civil Rights era. The program brilliantly demonstrated how our Park Service contributes to the common good by giving us thoughtfully curated sacred spaces where we can learn our shared history.

Just to mention a few of our NPS Parks and Monuments which were highlighted:
Fort Monroe National Monument, VA (site of first slave ship landing)
New York African Burial Ground National Monument
Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument, OH
National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom
Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument, MD
Reconstruction Era National Monument, SC
Tuskegee Airman National Historic Site, AL
Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial, Washington DC
Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument, AL
Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail, AL

If one were interested in delving deeper into learning from the rich experience of this country, the many ways which African Americans have struggled with, overcome bias and discrimination, and advanced themselves and all the rest of humanity, one could do a lot worse than visiting one of our National Parks as a starting place. Proximity creates connection.

After the NPS Town Hall events, we all went out to Continental Park for the Nationwide Bell Ringing Ceremony. I am grateful to know that many of you were part of similar experiences at churches and in parks around the country. Four minutes — one minute for each century since the White Lion made land — of sombre bell ringing began at 3:00 pm Eastern time, followed by shouts of joy, a sky full of paper butterflies, dance, music and celebration. Chief "Red Hawk" Brown of the Cheroenhaka (Nottoway) tribe blessed the land and offered an Iroqois prayer. The United States Colored Troop Ensemble sang, and "Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing" was beautifully played on violin by Gina Payne. Guest remarks from state and local elected officials and NPS staff, students and other dignitaries, with a focus on healing and repairing the breach, followed, and the evening was concluded with a gospel concert.

From the bulletin for the event:

"It is certain, in any case, that ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have." James Baldwin

Amen.

A favorite image, taken by Steven at Fort Monroe on Sunday afternoon.
Historic St. John’s in Hampton, VA dates to 1610. I had the great pleasure of
worshipping with St. John’s on Sunday, August 25.
Next up:
Join us in Vermont in September!
Join the Diocese of Vermont at St. James Episcopal Church — Essex Junction, Vermont on Saturday, September 7 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. to celebrate EPF’s 80th anniversary and the Feast Day of our Beloved Bishop Paul Jones!
EPF is pleased to be a sponsor of this event. Join us and say, "Enough" to the plague of gun violence in our country. We are grateful for our EPF members in the Washington, DC, area, who are dedicated to supporting this event and encouraging others to attend.

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

congratulates EPF on 80 years of loving action and witness.

He declares EPF’s activity is "Nothing less than

the work of God!" Join us in our 80th anniversary commemoration

with a pledge of financial support and social justice action! Can’t

make the video above play? Click here: https://f.io/R37u-4rP

Click HERE to give to our 80 day campaign!

Our upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

Sept. 1: Calvary Episcopal Church, Summit, NJ

Add your local event HERE or on your best date!

Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day

Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day observed, St. James, Essex Junction, VT

Sept. 8: The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, VT

Sept 15: Grace, Bath, ME

Sept. 23: Rally against gun violence, Washington, DC

Sept. 27-29: Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ

Oct 13-24: Palestine

Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI

Nov. 21-23: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Philip’s in the Hills, Tucson, AZ

Dec. 4: National Vigil for All Victims of Gun Violence (TBD)

Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! Someone in EPF national leadership is eager to be with you during our 80 days! epfactnow

Until next time,

power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Hatteras Lighthouse, near Buxton, North Carolina
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