Weekly Update from Melanie
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Four
EPF’s Year of Action continues with our August Pilgrimage to
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and
the National Legacy Museum in Montgomery, AL
August 9, 2019.
North Dallas EPF Chapter Convener Ron Damholt went on a pilgrimage in April to several sites significant to the Civil Rights era, including some of the sites we will visit on our late summer pilgrimage to Alabama. Below, Ron previews what some of our pilgrimage may look and feel like. Read on, and be inspired to join us, and be transformed.

In quieter moments, I find myself still gently descending a broad floor leading to the core of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which commemorates one of the true “hearts of darkness” of our country. Immense matte black rectangular blocks of corten steel, together bearing the names of over 4400 victims of lynching between 1877 and 1950, hang overhead; the constant, insistent sound of a wall of falling water resonates around me.

I pass by dozens of metal plaques bearing inscriptions. “Henry Patterson was lynched in Labelle, Florida, in 1926 for asking a white woman for a drink of water.” “Nathan Bird was lynched near Luling, Texas, in 1902, for refusing to turn his teenaged son over to a mob; his son, accused of fighting with a white boy, was also lynched.” “Calvin Kimblern was lynched by a mob of at least 3,000 people in Pueblo, Colorado, in 1900.”

On April 3, 2019, 36 parishioners from Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration in Dallas, TX departed on a Civil Rights tour to Alabama and Mississippi. We were led by our rector, Fr. Casey Shobe, and by Rev. Michael Waters, pastor of Joy Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Church in Dallas. And I believe it’s not an overstatement to say that our lives were about to be changed.

We traveled together for five days, visiting carefully chosen sites of historic significance: 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, where protesters were schooled in principles of nonviolence, and which in September 1963 would become the site of a bombing which would take the lives of four young girls; the Montgomery home of Dr. Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King, and the church Dr. King pastored; the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, over which we walked in silence, two-by-two, to gain a small sense of what marchers must have anticipated as they processed toward the police blockade on “Bloody Sunday” in 1965; the park in Hayneville, Alabama where Jonathan Myrick Daniels*, an Episcopal seminarian and civil rights activist, was shot to death while shielding a young black girl.

Thanks largely to Rev. Waters’ own work for racial justice – and relationships he has developed along the Way – we also received the gift of personal encounters with several who have led in the struggle for justice, who have “shared in the sufferings of Christ.” Ms. Janice Kelsey Wesley, a Birmingham educator, participated in the 1963 Children’s March and was one of nearly 2000 children arrested, many having also been attacked with high-pressure hoses and police dogs. Dr. Valda Montgomery told us the work of her father, a pharmacist, in quietly organizing a massive taxi service during the crucial Montgomery bus boycott. And Ms. Joanne Bland of the Selma Interpretive Center, who by age 11 had been arrested 13 times, graphically described that “Bloody Sunday” march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in which she was a participant.

We also visited several important museums, including the National Legacy Museum in Montgomery, dedicated to the compelling argument that much of the prison system in the United States was shaped as an effort to extend slavery in another form, and that our present criminal justice system continues in injustice: in 2017, approximately 27% of all persons arrested were “black or African American,” while at the end of that year 476,000 prisoners were black, and 436,000 white. But the single most powerful experience of our five days for me was the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, sometimes called the “Lynching Museum,” also in Montgomery, to which I referred at the start of this brief essay.

I thank God for these experiences, for Fr. Shobe leading us in prayer and worship, for quiet conversations along the way. I give thanks for Rev. Waters, part of whose calling is to lead groups such as ours, and without whom our trip would have been significantly less rich. I want to thank my fellow-travelers Bill and Peggy Kwoka, whose fine notes on our journey helped spur my memories, and filled out many details which I had lost. But most powerfully, I’m grateful to be part of a community willing to continue to struggle with being the Body of Christ in the world, and which actually strives to exist for the sake of those outside its walls, to “grow up into the full measure of Christ.”

*Episcopal seminarian Jonathan Myrick Daniels heard Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s call to go to Alabama to help register people to vote. Daniels was martyred on August 20, 1965 in Hayneville, AL, when he stepped in front of a loaded shotgun to save the life of teenager Ruby Sales. Daniels is commemorated every year with a pilgrimage to the place of his murder, the jail cell which held him prior to his death, and the courthouse where his killer was exonerated. This passage from Isaiah inspired Daniels’ action. (Photo credit Bridget Reeves Tytler) . Read more in "Outside Agitator: Jon Daniels and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama" by Charles W. Eagles or watch "The Granite Saint: The Story of Jonathan Daniels" on www.wmur.com. EPF will participate in this pilgrimage this August.
Jonathan Myrick Daniels icon hangs in the chancel at
St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
LOOKING FORWARD TO
EPF’S NEXT YEAR OF ACTION EVENT!
The next stop on EPF’s 80th Anniversary Year of Action will be in Alabama. Join us August 9-10, 2019 in Montgomery for our pilgrimage to the The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and The Legacy Museum (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org) followed by the annual Jonathan Myrick Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville, Lowndes County, Alabama, sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama and the Episcopal Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast.
Some holy spaces have stained glass; St. Mark’s – Raleigh NC has this luminous woven tapestry as a center piece. Saxophone and piano accompanied our recessional, "Lift Every Voice and Sing" which never fails to remind me that worship is supposed to empower and embolden us to action.
This week, I worshipped at St. Mark’s, Raleigh, NC, with my collaborative lawyer friend, John Sarratt. St. Mark’s is a former EPF Peace Partner Parish with a long, steady tradition of social justice ministry. It was nice to have a chance to connect with so many people who already understand what EPF is all about! I also had the chance to attend the World Refugee Day event held in Central Park in Durham, NC with EPF PIN stalwart Donna Hicks. Topping off my time in central North Carolina was a brief visit with Ethan Vesely-Flad, who is about to take a year long sabbatical to Ghana and West Africa. Ethan has been invaluable in connecting this EPF newcomer to several social justice allies. Godspeed, Ethan, to you and your family!
Entryway to St. Mark’s peaceful columbarium, Raleigh, NC
Advocacy against drone warfare
EPF is participating in this important work — learning to advocate against drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. We have one committed volunteer — Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ. Are you Interested in this opportunity? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow
Mark your calendars now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorials on Friday, then participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage on Saturday. More details (including our entry times to the Lynching Memorials) and registration coming soon, so watch this space!
Thanks to Steve France of our EPF Palestine Israel Network for this announcement:

The extreme, right-wing, Fundamentalist Christian Zionists of "Christians United for Israel" are coming July 7-9 in their thousands for their annual "Washington Summit" at the Convention Center. Their mission: place heavy constituent pressure on Congress to ramp up support for even harsher (indeed apocalyptic) policies against the Palestinians.

BUT for the first time, CUFI will be met by an unprecedented, highly organized protest from Christians, Muslims and Jews — and all who support Palestinian rights. Among Christians, we who believe that the Gospel calls on us to pursue justice for all, peace, brotherhood, and respect for the dignity of all people must not be silent. Church-based supporters of Palestinian rights must raise our voices — nonviolently, faithfully, AND BOLDLY.

The protest is being organized by Friends of Sabeel North America, with the active support of Jewish Voice for Peace and American Muslims for Palestine. EPF-PIN has endorsed the action and has tasked DC members to help with preparations. FOSNA is urging people to register on their website (fosna.org) so as to ensure that this action, which is just the start of a long-term, national campaign to expose and oppose CUFI, will be a model of tolerance, restraint and seriousness.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
June 29: 20th Annual Starvin’ for Justice Fast and Vigil, Washington, DC
June 30: Washington Episcopal Holy Land Committee
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 13: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI
July 14: St. Thomas, Battle Creek, MI
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Chicago, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 7: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day, St. James, Essex Junction
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
EPF is gathering a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, immediately following the Province V Big Provincial Meeting in Kalamazoo. Time is 4:00 pm on Saturday, July 13, at the corner of Division and Michigan Avenue in Battle Creek. A light picnic will follow a time of remembrance and prayers. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20. Photo credit Rob Burgess.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (home or church parking lot appreciated)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite RV camp sites.
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
A black bear visits the back yard of Ginny and Bill Pierson,
aptly named "Peaceful Hollow"
where Steven, Miranda and I had the pleasure of staying while in Asheville.
STAY CONNECTED
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Peace Out: Week Twenty-Three
EPF CHAPTER OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA:
FAITHFUL, NON-VIOLENT WAR RESISTERS
This week took us from Winston-Salem, through Boone, Conover, and Hendersonville into Asheville, North Carolina. I was welcomed by our EPF Chapter of Western North Carolina at the glorious Cathedral of All Souls on Sunday afternoon for a mutual pep-rally, of sorts.

Like our EPF national organization, EPF-WNC was born of war-protest. After the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, the chapter organized and began a ten year vigil on the lawn of the Cathedral, which is conspicuous outside the entrance to the Biltmore House, holding signs in opposition to the war, including encouragement to "Pray for Peace and Justice." To bring the message of peace and justice into the lives of the congregation and community more deeply, the chapter has also sponsored lectures on gun control, abolition of capital punishment, non-violence, The Innocence Project, and environmental concerns. More recently, encouraging others to register to vote and then to vote consistently with their baptismal promises has been a priority, as have ongoing efforts to feed the hungry. The chapter and All Souls are primary sponsors of "Loving Food Resources" (grocery bag pictured above), which has, for 25 years, provided basic needs for people living with HIV/AIDS and persons in Home Hospice care. More than 80 people utilize the pantry each week. Learn more at www.lovingfood.org.

One of the chapter’s conveners is the Very Rev. Ross Jones, former dean of St. George’s College in Jerusalem. Fr. Ross and his wife, Gwen, have connected the chapter intimately to the issues of our Palestine-Israel Network, and much of our time together on Sunday was spent lamenting the current state of affairs in Palestine and catching up on the good work and organizing efforts of our PIN Action Group.

I left inspired, knowing that social justice work in North Carolina is in capable, caring hearts and hands!

Cathedral of All Souls, Asheville, NC
Peacock banner at All Souls Cathedral suggests the beautiful power of transformation.
Join EPF members from around the country, including Jack and Chris Payden-Travers of St. Anne’s, Winston-Salem, and me for the annual Fast and Vigil to abolish the death penalty, June 29-July 2, in Washington, DC. Details at www.abolition.org.
Mark your calendars now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! We have a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriott, 5555 Carmichael Road, Montgomery, AL for the evenings of August 9 and 10. Call (334) 272-5533 and ask to speak with "sales" about the Episcopal Peace Fellowship block and they will set you up with our rate ($119/night). We’ll visit the Lynching Memorials on Friday, then participate in the Jonathan Daniels Pilgrimage on Saturday. More details and registration coming soon, so watch this space!
Advocacy against drone warfare
EPF is participating in this important work — learning to advocate against drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. EPF member Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ is planning to attend — are you Interested in this ministry? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow
Our Ithica, New York, Area Episcopal Peace Fellowship
reports an amazing and inspiring event held last week:

EQUALITY, FREEDOM, JUSTICE, AND PEACE FOR ALL IN ISRAEL /PALESTINE: An interfaith conversation between Mother Megan Castellan, St. John’s Episcopal Church, and Rabbi Brian Walt, Congregation Tikkun v’Or; moderated by Laura Branca, Dorothy Cotton Institute was held on Thursday, June 13, at St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Mother Megan and Rabbi Brian share a commitment to work toward an equitable and just resolution to the ongoing and worsening crisis in Israel/Palestine. Their commitment is rooted in their respective faiths and based on their personal experiences and witness in Israel/Palestine. They shared how they—as a rabbi and a priest—understand what they have observed and why this calling is central to their spiritual and ethical commitments. Their conversation was inspiring and edifying.

The event was organized by Ithaca Jewish Voice for Peace/Committee for Justice in Palestine and the Ithaca Area Episcopal Peace Fellowship, and was co- sponsored by St. John’s Episcopal Church, Dorothy Cotton Institute, Congregation Tikkun v’Or, Ithaca Area Congregations Together, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Church of the Epiphany, Ithaca Interfaith Center for Action and Healing, Group 73 of Amnesty International, Ithaca Catholic Worker and others.

Thanks to EPF PIN Convenor Linda Gaither for this news.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Steven, Miranda and I will still be in North Carolina for the next several weeks! Are you here, too!? Let me know if you want to meet for coffee or worship!

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 23: St. Mark’s, Raleigh NC (tentative)
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 29: 20th Annual Starvin’ for Justice Fast and Vigil, Washington, DC
June 30: Washington Episcopal Holy Land Committee
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 13: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI (in the works!)
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Chicago, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day, Diocese of Vermont
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
Our special treat is a GO! EPF is gathering a group to visit the Sojourner Truth Memorial in Battle Creek, Michigan, immediately following the Province V Big Provincial Meeting in Kalamazoo. Time is 4:00 pm on Saturday, July 13, at the corner of Division and Michigan Avenue in Battle Creek. A light picnic will follow a time of remembrance and prayers. Blessed Sojourner’s feast day is July 20. Photo credit Rob Burgess.
Gorgeous garden at the home of our hosts, Ginny and Bill Pierson, Asheville, NC.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Join an EPF committee
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Twenty-One
PENTECOST ACTION: GET INVOLVED WITH EPF!
Our vibrant EPF committees would epfactnow and let me know where you would like to serve. Current NEC leadership for each committee is listed after each committee description:

Communications: Establish a communications strategy for EPF; provide ED content for website, social media, and Constant Contact communications; look at website for adequacy for our needs; manage social media platforms and “comments”; blogging; help decide how to manage mail for EPF’s virtual office; volunteer to help with virtual office details. (NEC leadership: Ellen Lindeen, Barrington, IL)

Sustainability: Develop a multi-year diversified development plan and goals for EPF; help with fundraising, budgeting, determining long range financial needs and campaigns; help consider how EPF money should be managed; determine electronic banking needs and look at bank investments to determine suitability for managing EPF’s money. (NEC leadership: Rt. Rev. Jeff Fisher, Tyler, TX; Katherine Bailey Brown, Austin, TX)

Membership: Create the requirements and commitments for EPF membership for individuals; recruiting member initiatives; help look at donor and contact database management; chapter and peace partner recruiting. (NEC leadership: Betsy Davidson, Traverse City, MI; Rev. Richard Wineland, Nashville, TN)

Programming: help with resources for missions of EPF (curriculum, materials, speakers bureau, etc.) and pilgrimages (Year of Action and urban pilgrimages); consult on management of EPF virtual store; plan for 2021 General Convention, review and expand partnership with other peace organizations. (NEC leadership Rev. Michael Kurth, Port Chester, NY; Br. Columba Maynus, Minneapolis, MN)

I had the pleasure of worshiping at St. Philip’s, Brevard, North Carolina this week. Besides having some stunning stained glass windows, this holy space supports so much good in the world: feeding the hungry, supporting social outreach, and enabling children to attend summer camp in North Carolina’s gorgeous outdoors. Rev. Thomas Murphy, rector, had an inspiring message reminding us that, as disciples of Christ, we are called to be reconcilers. Sounds like EPF work to me!
SACRED GROUND!
OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS CURRICULUM
FOR RACIAL RECONCILIATION

Individuals or groups interested in learning more about Sacred Ground: a film-based dialogue series on race and faith are invited to an introductory webinar hosted by Katrina Browne, Sacred Ground curriculum developer, and producer/director of the acclaimed documentary Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, and the Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, canon to the Presiding Bishop for evangelism, reconciliation, and creation care.

Built around a curriculum of powerful documentary films, videos, and readings, Sacred Ground is a 10-part series that considers some of the major chapters of the United States of America’s history of race and racism. It focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino, and Asian American histories as they intersect with European American histories. It also invites participants to weave in the threads of personal and family story, economic class, and political and regional identity.

In this webinar, Spellers and Browne share the “why and how” of the Sacred Ground series, including an overview of all of the elements of this resource. They will take participants through the online Sacred Ground curriculum and resources, including the password-protected pages. There will be time for questions.

This free one-hour webinar is offered on Tuesday June 11, 1pm Eastern (noon Central/11am Mountain/10am Pacific/9am Alaska/7am Hawaii); Register here.

Registration is required.

“More than a teaching tool, Sacred Ground calls us into intentional, sustained circles in which we can pray, watch, share our own stories, reflect, wonder, reckon, heal, and commit to action. Think of it as a pilgrimage in place,” notes Spellers.

Click here to begin to explore the Sacred Ground webpages, and to sign up to receive additional resources. The press release for the series is here.

Mark your calendars now to join EPF for our next Year of Action event: August 9-10 pilgrimage to Alabama and the National Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Justice and Peace in Montgomery, and the annual Jonathan Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville. Don’t miss this chance to participate in these transformative experiences with your EPF colleagues! More details coming soon. See last week’s "Peace Out" for background!
IN THE WAKE
OF THE SLAUGHTER AT VIRGINIA BEACH,
TAKE ACTION FOR
GUN VIOLENCE PREVENTION:
WEAR ORANGE
THIS WEEKEND!
JOIN ME IN WINSTON-SALEM, NC or
AT AN EVENT IN YOUR HOMETOWN!
Wear Orange Weekend to create awareness around
gun violence prevention is June 7-9, 2019.
Find an event near you at https://wearorange.org.
Advocacy against drone warfare
EPF is participating in this important work — learning to advocate against drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. EPF member Allie Graham of Princeton, NJ is planning to attend — are you Interested in this ministry? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow
NEW HAMPSHIRE ABOLISHES THE DEATH PENALTY!

Read more about this hopeful news, and join our Death Penalty Abolition Action Group to make progress in your jurisdiction! Read more here:
https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2019/05/30/episcopal-leaders-cheer-new-hampshire-becoming-21th-state-to-outlaw-death-penalty/

From Caroline Stevenson and Furonda Brasfield,
death penalty abolition advocates in Arkansas:

"Congratulations to the many advocates in New Hampshire who have given so much and worked so long and hard to make abolition of the death penalty a reality.
The EPF Chapter of Arkansas and the Arkansas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty are really encouraged by what you’ve accomplished."

Behold the Knife Angel, an art installation traveling in England. Comprised of 100,000 blades confiscated or turned in during amnesties, artist Alfie Bradley created this 27-foot high statue as a sobering reminder to the lives lost in knife crime in the UK. Bradley calls it a monument against violence and aggression. I learned of this angel from a waitress who overheard a group of us EPF-ers talking passionately about gun control in a Knoxville, TN restaurant recently. She graciously emailed me this photo a friend had sent to her. Reminds me of Shane Claiborne’s "Beating Guns" initiative.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Steven, Miranda and I will be in North Carolina for the next several weeks! Are you here, too!? Let me know if you want to meet for coffee or worship!

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 8: Wear Orange for Gun Violence Prevention, Winston Salem, NC
June 9: Pentecost with St. Anne’s, Winston Salem, NC
June 19: Juneteenth event, Lenoir-Rhyne University, Asheville, NC
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 20: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI (tentative)
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
July 25: Chicago, IL
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones’ feast day, Diocese of Vermont
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
Long Creek, South Carolina. Lovely gateway to the Blue Ridge Mountains.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Join an EPF committee
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
Weekly Update from Melanie
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Twenty
Episcopal seminarian Jonathan Myrick Daniels heard Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s call to go to Alabama to help register people to vote. Daniels was martyred on August 20, 1965 in Hayneville, AL, when he stepped in front of a loaded shotgun to save the life of teenager Ruby Sales. Daniels is commemorated every year with a pilgrimage to the place of his murder, the jail cell which held him prior to his death, and the courthouse where his killer was exonerated. This passage from Isaiah inspired Daniels’ action. (Photo credit Bridget Reeves Tytler) . Read more in "Outside Agitator: Jon Daniels and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama" by Charles W. Eagles or watch "The Granite Saint: The Story of Jonathan Daniels" on www.wmur.com.
LOOKING FORWARD TO
EPF’S NEXT YEAR OF ACTION EVENT!
The next stop on EPF’s 80th Anniversary Year of Action will be in Alabama. Join us August 9-10, 2019 in Montgomery for our pilgrimage to the The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and The Legacy Museum (www.museumandmemorial.eji.org) followed by the annual Jonathan Myrick Daniels and the Martyrs of Alabama Pilgrimage to Hayneville, Lowndes County, Alabama, sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama and the Episcopal Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast.
Many are calling the Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice the "Lynching Memorial." It is a project of Bryan Stevenson and the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery. The Lynching Memorial powerfully makes the case that racial terror is alive and well in America today, and that we continue to enslave our young men of color at alarming rates. It is a simple fact that one in three young black men in America will go to prison and will remain disenfranchised and stigmatized by our justice system. We will visit these landmark memorials on Friday, August 9.

On Saturday, August 10, EPF will join in the Jonathan Myrick Daniels Pilgrimage which will take place in Hayneville in Lowndes County, Alabama. From the Diocese of Alabama website: "Over its 23 years, the pilgrimage has grown into one of the most recognized pilgrimages of our Church, bringing people from many dioceses and seminaries across the country to the spot where Daniels, an Episcopal seminarian from Keene, New Hampshire, was shot to death in August 1965 trying to protect an African-American teenage girl. The event is held annually on the second Saturday of August.

"The Pilgrimage begins at 11:00 a.m. in front of the courthouse in Hayneville, the place where an all-white jury in a sham trial lasting less than an hour found Jonathan’s murderer, Tom Coleman, not guilty. Pilgrims march to the jail where Daniels and his companions were held, and from there to the place where he was killed at a small country store that has since been razed, then back to the courthouse. In a moving Eucharist, the judge’s bench of that 1965 trial becomes the altar on which the sacrament is consecrated. Fourteen other martyrs of the Alabama civil rights movement are recognized and honored in this service as well as Daniels."

Plan to join us for these painful and transformative experiences, where we look the awful truth of our hateful heritage in the face, and come away inspired to help those of us still imprisoned by our systemic racism become free at last. As Bishop of California Rt. Rev. Marc Andrus once said of the Jonathan Daniels’ pilgrimage, “What happens here today is an opportunity for Episcopalians to search for reconciliation across all lines that divide us.”

Hotel details, transportation and ticket information for the memorials and pilgrimage will be available soon, so watch this space!

"For the hanged and beaten.
For the shot, drowned, and burned.
For the tortured, tormented, and terrorized.
For those abandoned by the rule of law.
We will remember.

With hope because hopelessness is the enemy of justice.
With courage because peace requires bravery.
With persistence because justice is a constant struggle.
With faith because we shall overcome.”

Like so many tortured, hanging people of color,
each county memorial hangs with rust tracks
that evoke the blood of the slain, whose
names are inscribed thereon.
"Raise Up" by Hank Willis Thomas is among
the powerful sculptures at the
National Memorial for Peace and Justice.
Past meets present.
Horrific lynchings were not only terror in the South.
Jonathan Myrick Daniels icon hangs at
St. Andrew’s-Birmingham, Alabama.
His feast day is August 14.
The August pilgrimage also commemorates the other martyrs of the civil rights movement, among them: Willie Edmunds, William Lewis Moore, Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley, Virgil Lamar Ware, Jimmie Lee Jackson, Rev. James Rabe, Vida Gregg Liuzzo, Willie Brewster, and Samuel Leamon Younge, Jr. Placards for each martyr are carried along the pilgrimage route and each story is told at the memorial Eucharist, held following the pilgrimage in the Lowndes County Courthouse where Jonathan Daniel’s killer, an off duty sheriff’s deputy, was exonerated by an all white jury. (Photo credit Bridget Reeves Tytler)
GUN VIOLENCE PREVENTION WEEKEND
Wear Orange Weekend to create awareness around
gun violence prevention is June 7-9, 2019.
Find an event near you at https://wearorange.org.
And speaking of Gun Violence Prevention advocacy,
this just in from our North Dallas EPF Chapter:

The Peace Mennonite Church in Dallas invited the North Dallas EPF Chapter to dinner and a movie (followed by discussion). The film, “Beating Guns,” is based on a book by Shane Claiborne and Mike Martin. You can preview the movie at beatingguns.com.

What a great idea for our Peace Partner Parishes and Chapters to replicate! Thanks to North Dallas EPF Convener Ron Damholt for the link and the information.

Advocacy against drone warfare
EPF is participating in this important work — learning to advocate against drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. We have one committed volunteer — are you Interested in this important ministry? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 8: Wear Orange for Gun Violence Prevention, Winston Salem, NC
June 19: Juneteenth event, Lenoir-Rhyne University, Asheville, NC
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
July 20: Commemoration of Sojourner Truth, Battle Creek, MI
July 21: Grace Episcopal Church, Traverse City, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, Diocese of Vermont
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
Rhododendron blooming in Tate City, Georgia over Memorial Day weekend. Cool and peaceful.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Nineteen
Festive floral wall mural at
Adelante Alabama Worker Center in Hoover, Alabama
www.adelantealabama.org
These saints are empowering immigrant workers
to deal with wage theft and abusive landlords, among much else.
Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God.

Luke 6:20

There’s no place like home! I say this despite the draconian abortion bill that Alabama’s legislature passed last week — another reason my home state is famously hostile towards "other" and the poor. It was a joy to see family and a few friends and to watch Tate graduate and get him moved into his new apartment. I even had an unexpected opportunity to take part in a bus tour for The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival (www.poorpeoplescampaign.org) in Birmingham and to see friends from St. Andrew’s.

I also got to spend some time with our Peace Partners in Tennessee while I was home. Rev. Richard Wineland, EPF National Executive Committee Chaplain, hosted EPF on Tuesday evening at St. Ann’s-Nashville. Sponsored by our new Nashville EPF Chapter and the Beloved Community of the Diocese of Tennessee, we opened with a protest song, "Marchin’ into Freedom’s Land" and a prayer for peace. Present were members of the Nashville EPF Chapter, including Cate Faulkner (2018 EPF Young Adult Delegate to General Convention), members of St. Augustine’s-Nashville, St. Ann’s-Nashville, St. James-Murfreesboro, Christ Church-Nashville and Church of the Epiphany-Lebanon. So much going on in social justice in middle Tennessee already! Ed Miller of Christ Church is a vocal and effective advocate against the death penalty. Many folks are involved in prison ministry and re-entry ministries, gun violence prevention advocacy (including work with Mom’s Demand Action), environmental justice and racial reconciliation work, just to name a few. The group buoyed me with prayers before we had a nice reception following our time for sharing. I’m so grateful for all the hard work that went into arranging this visit, and for that work that will come now that foundation for a social justice community has been established. Y’all keep up the good work, and don’t let nobody turn you around!

Altar at St. Ann’s – Nashville, TN
The church is glorious in her rebirth
following a tornado which destroyed the sanctuary in 1998.
The Cathedral of St. John’s in Knoxville, hosted a community wide event to re-introduce Knoxville to EPF on Thursday. EPF member Joel Morris generously hosted me, treated me to lunch with the EPF faithful, and organized the networking event. Joel had invited folks from all over the Diocese of East Tennessee, including Bishop Brian Cole, who attended and led us into the event with a prayer for the condemned Don Johnson, who was executed by the State of Tennessee later that very day. Johnson died while singing a hymn as the lethal drugs were administered. Bp. Cole professed his hope that all Episcopalians could get behind abolition of the death penalty, to which we say, "Amen."

Social justice ministry runs deep in the Diocese of East Tennessee. Members of "Women in Black For Justice, against War" stand faithfully every single Tuesday from noon until 12:45 in protest of the occupation of Palestine by Israel. (www.womeninblack,org) Longstanding EPF members Helen deHaven and Barbara Hickey (St. James-Knoxville) and Ed Patrick (St. John’s Cathedral) attended the event and are shining examples of ongoing dedication to bringing justice for the Palestinians.

One of the Diocese of Alabama’s oldest parishes:
Holy Comforter, Montgomery, Alabama,
where I had the pleasure of worshiping on Sunday.
EPF is looking for members to sign up for this conference on drone warfare. We would like to send at least two of us to Princeton, NJ to represent Episcopalians everywhere and then to carry this advocacy forward for us. Interested in this important ministry? Let us know and let’s see how we can make funds available to help get you there! epfactnow
2018 John Nevin Sayre award winner
Rev. Patrick Augustine will be elevated to
Assistant Bishop of the Diocese of Bor
in South Sudan this summer. Congratulations, Pat!

Read more here:https://lacrossetribune.com/news/local/rev-patrick-augustine-leaving-la-crosse-episcopal-church-after-years/article_c80d9ecb-d208-53a9-9189-129a336296fc.html

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

June 19: Juneteenth event, Lenoir-Rhyne University, Asheville, NC
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, location TBD
Sept. 27-29 Drone warfare initiative, Princeton, NJ
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12 at 6:00pm!
I usually try to save my closing images for something pastoral or peaceful from nature, but my time with the bus tour for the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival in Birmingham on Saturday makes me want to call out the devastating polluters in Birmingham, among them Jordan Scrap Metal. It’s horrible that these dump sites are directly adjacent to private homes. Before noon, my throat was burning and my eyes ached. Hard to image living next to this mess; impossible to see it and not take some sort of action to try to help.

I’d been looking for an opportunity to hook up with a Poor People’s bus tour during my travels, and was glad to be able to find one in my hometown. On the tour — from the Diocese of Alabama — were five vocational deacons: Archdeacon Emeritus Lou Thibodaux, Deacon Gerri Aston (St. Andrew’s- Birmingham) (my home parish!), Deacon Kelli Hudlow (Diocese of Alabama Communications Coordinator), Deacon Carolyn Foster (St. Mark’s-Birmingham) and Deacon John Stewart (St. Matthias- Tuscaloosa). The Episcopal peace makers were out in force and constituted almost half of those on the tour! Double bonus points: my friend Martha Jane Patton was there! Talk about a win-win!

How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
  • Home baked goodies (only if you are baking, anyway).
  • Make time to see her and introduce her around!
  • Favorite sites for photo ops.
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Eighteen
Banner outside new Peace Partner Parish, Calvary Episcopal Church- Memphis, TN
Loving God, make us instruments of your peace.
This week we had inspiring visits with Peace Partner Parishes St. Michael’s in Little Rock, AR and Calvary in Memphis, TN en route to our son, Tate’s, graduation from Vanderbilt in Nashville. A lot of joy and contagious commitment to service was in our path!

Steven and I enjoyed lunch at the Clinton Presidential Center and Park with Caroline Stevenson and Rev. Lisa Hlass of St. Michael’s – Little Rock last Saturday. St. Michael’s is a peace partner of longstanding, with Rev. Lisa Hlass having served as convener of the Arkansas chapter of EPF and as a member of the National Executive Committee. Caroline Stevenson is last year’s winner of the EPF John Nevin Sayre award given at General Convention for (among her other social justice activities) her work in support of abolition of the death penalty in Arkansas. She organizes Arkansas Peace Week each year (https://arkansaspeaceweek.com) and is largely responsible for making the natural state of Arkansas one of peace and justice.

St. Michael’s motto is "vanquishing the modern day dragons of poverty, disease and intolerance," a social justice call to service if ever there was one. St. Michael’s is committed to environmental justice, with a large array of solar panels on the roof of their parish house which supplies 25% of the parish’s energy needs. One of their parishioners, Eve Jorgenson, is recognized for her work with Mom’s Demand Action for Gun Sense for her effective advocacy against gun violence. Eve has grown the grass roots organization’s membership and is responsible for significant changes in Arkansas gun laws.
Steven and I enjoyed an opportunity to worship with St. Michael’s and to share in their generous hospitality at their Sunday brunch between services. We are so grateful for their time and sharing with us, and we look forward to spending more time learning from these remarkable servants the next time we are in Arkansas.

Altar and window overlooking dogwoods and peaceful columbarium at St. Michael’s – Little Rock, AR. This parish is certainly at home in the world, doing the work we are called to do.
On Monday, I was able to stop in to see Rev. Scott Walters at Calvary- Memphis, our newest peace partner parish. Theirs is a remarkable story of witness in the middle of downtown Memphis, one of America’s poorest urban centers.

From Calvary’s 2018 Year in Review:

"The long struggle to achieve justice, freedom, and peace includes confronting difficult aspects of our past.

"At noon on April 4, 2018, Calvary Episcopal Church held a service of “Remembrance and Reconciliation,” in the church, after which Calvary, Rhodes College, and the National Park Service unveiled a historic marker
at the site of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s antebellum slave mart. These events were intended to remember the names of those who were sold at the site, to respect the dignity of their humanity, and to facilitate the process of reconciliation and healing in our community and our country.

"Between 1854 and 1860, slave traders bought and sold thousands of enslaved people at 87 Adams Street, between Second and Third, just east of an alley behind Calvary Episcopal Church.

"Acknowledging the injustice and oppression that occurred on property now owned by the church helps to fulfill both our civic and religious obligations. It is a way of helping to bring about the “more perfect Union” described by the American founders and the “beloved community” envisioned by
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Most important, it is a tiny step toward fulfilling our duty as Christians to help bring about the Kingdom of God.

"In 1968, Dr. King came to Memphis to show solidarity with striking sanitation workers, who held signs that said, “I am a Man.” Fifty years later, we stand with the sanitation workers, the enslaved sold behind Calvary Church, and the forgotten men and women in every generation who have aspired to claim their humanity as children of God."

Here’s a link to the video about the service for the historical marker dedication and service of remembrance and reconciliation at Calvary:

https://youtu.be/AFjzHLz9ki0

For the longest, only this marker stood on the street announcing the site of Calvary as the childhood home of Nathan Bedford Forrest. "His business enterprises made him wealthy," indeed.
Telling the rest of the truth of the story of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s "business activities" on the site of Calvary Episcopal Church, these two markers placed by Calvary, Rhodes, and the National Park Service were dedicated last year, throwing light on the evil of his slave trade.
On The Row
Stories from Arkansas’ Death Row

The Prison Story Project will be touring a staged reading of On The Row, stories from Arkansas’ death row this summer to Episcopal churches in four states.

Founded in 2012 as a ministry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, Arkansas by storyteller Kathy McGregor, the Prison Story Project benefits incarcerated women and men. Inmates explore their truths through poetry, creative writing, literature, songwriting, and visual art.

Their work is then curated into a staged reading performed by actors. The goal of the Prison Story Project is to enable those whose voices have been locked away to tell their stories, allowing communities to witness the humanity and redemption of the incarcerated through their own words.

From May – October 2016, the project was given unprecedented access to the men on Arkansas’ death row. Eleven of the thirty-four men on the row at that time volunteered to participate. The stories and poems the death row inmates wrote were guided by McGregor and creative writing director, Matt Henriksen, and then edited into a script by theatre director, Troy Schremmer. Their work was presented back to them on October 8, 2016 by professional actors in a cramped aisle on death row between individual cages that held each man.

The team didn’t know how they would react to a presentation of their writing. When the performance started, everyone fell to silence and listened deeply. As one of the men wrote in a thank you letter to McGregor afterwards, “We were all transformed by the writing we heard that day. The writing, they said, culminated in something that’s bigger than all of us.” “We are the broken ones” another said, “that with your help were patched up to shine like new.” please note: we are not allowed to use names of living death row inmates.

“The men we served on Arkansas’ death row didn’t dwell on their pasts or blame others for their crimes,” Henriksen said afterwards. “Some of them had found an immense peace that eludes many of us in the free world, and they wanted to share it purely out of gratitude for having found it. McGregor added, “By facing their crimes, enduring their sentences, and accepting their impending deaths, they each found ways to survive, seek self-forgiveness, experience God’s redemption, and retain their humanity.”

Four of the men that participated in the project were on the list of eight to be executed just after Easter 2017. Don Davis and Stacey Johnson received last minute stays of execution. Jack Jones was executed on April 24 at 7:06pm, pronounced dead at 7:20pm. Minister Kenneth Williams was executed on April 27 at 10:52pm, pronounced dead at 11:05pm. Kenneth was proud to know that while he was on death watch the night before his execution, the Prison Story Project was holding a community poetry reading of his work at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville (video on the website). He also requested that Matt and Kathy read some of his poetry at his funeral in Pine Bluff.

The Prison Story Project has toured On The Row to audiences in Northwest Arkansas and college campuses across the country since 2016. The project has recently received grants from Mid-America Arts Alliance; The Whiting Foundation for the Humanities (through the University of Arkansas); and Episcopal Evangelism Society, with additional support from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Fayetteville.
With this generous funding the Prison Story Project has toured several high schools and juvenile detention centers in Arkansas this year with an abridged version of the script appropriate for students.

The funding will also allow the Prison Story Project to tour to high schools in six additional counties in Arkansas in the fall of 2019 and will allow the group to tour On The Row to Episcopal Churches in four states this summer:

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Kansas City, MO: Thursday, June 13 at 7:30pm
St. James Episcopal Church, Wichita, KS: Friday, June 14 at 7:30pm
Christ Church Episcopal, Tulsa, OK: Saturday, June 15 at 7:30pm
Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, Dallas, TX, Sunday, June 16 at 2:00pm

For more information, please visit www.prisonstoryproject.com or contact:
Kathy McGregor, Project Director, at prisonstoryproject, 479-871-4875

Kathy McGregor is a member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, Arkansas where she is a second year student in the Iona Arkansas Initiative, on the diaconate track. She is the project director for The Prison Story Project.

St. Augustine’s Tiny House Project

Rob Burgess, EPF treasurer and leader in Western Michigan at St. Augustine’s, Benton Harbor, MI, let us know about a youth project in his church, partnering with St. Andrew’s University and others to create tiny houses as transitional housing for the homeless. Read more:

https://www.heraldpalladium.com/news/local/small-hands-big-hearts-building-tiny-house/article_befd9858-60db-5dce-94e8-d380eba2d528.html

Manzanar Pilgrimage
offered by
Randy Heyn-Lamb
EPF-PIN member
All Saint’s – Pasadena, CA
This weekend, a group of us traveled 3+ hours north from LA to participate in the 50th annual pilgrimage to the Manzanar internment camp located on the Eastern slopes of the Sierra mountains.

For those not familiar with the history, Manzanar is 1 of 10 internment camps opened by our government in early 1942 to isolate and secure Japanese Americans living in western United States after the attack at Pearl Harbor.

Most were American citizens, but they were given 2 weeks or less to reduce their personal belongings to what could fit into a suitcase. Bank accounts were frozen. Homes were sold for pennies on the dollar. Furniture was left on the sidewalk. Jobs were lost and businesses that were open one day were closed the next.

What awaited the 10,000+ Manzanar detainees were hastily constructed barracks made of plywood and tar paper the camp surrounded by barbed wire and guard towers facing in. Blazing hot in summer, freezing cold in winter and unable in any season to keep out the blowing dust. Mess halls replaced family dining rooms. There were group showers and multi-toilet privies without privacy dividers.

And when the war came to an end 3-1/2 years later, they were sent back to a place that was no longer home, to start over in the face of racial hatred, with little more than $25 and a bus ticket.

The Japanese American community has largely recovered from the events of 75 years ago. But many have retained a sensitivity to racism, so that, even as we were commemorating their own survival, they found room to include members of the local Paiute/Shoshone people who inhabited the land long before the Spanish or Americans colonized California, and whose ancestral burial grounds are threatened by a solar energy farm.

Also present, every year since 9/11, were members of the LA Muslim community who have found support from the Japanese Americans in their own fight against Islamophobia, immigration limitations and travel bans.

Many of us were also painfully aware, even as we renewed our vows to oppose racial profiling or future internment camps, that just a few hours down Hwy 395 from where we stood, Central American and other melanin-richer refugees are being held in the Adelanto Detention Center. a privately-run prison; and that children are separated from their asylum-seeking parents with little hope of rapid reunification. Perhaps we should be holding our commemoration there instead?

And finally, as we tried to keep hydrated in the high desert heat, I contemplated the intense irony of drinking bottled water whose source was in the snow-covered peaks above me. That water is still being sent to quench the thirsty people and lawns of LA, in quantities too large not to harm the economy and ecology of the Owens Valley. So I breathe a prayer of repentance and pour some of the water from my bottle back to the earth, returning it to its home. God, have mercy.

Melanie’s upcoming schedule:

Looking forward, EPF will be in:

May 14: St. Ann’s, Nashville, TN
May 16: St. John’s Cathedral, Knoxville, TN
June 19: Juneteenth event with Fellowship of Reconciliation, location TBD
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, location TBD
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Happy Easter!

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Shore of the peaceful Illinois River, Gore Landing, OK
Join us at the Province V Big Provincial Gathering in July!
Early bird registration ends TODAY!
We’d love to see you at our evening reception on Friday, July 12!
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
  • Home baked goodies (only if you are baking, anyway).
  • Make time to see her and introduce her around!
  • Favorite sites for photo ops.
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Seventeen
COLUMBINE REMEMBRANCE
Those who walk uprightly enter into peace.

Isaiah 57:1-2

(From the inscription on the memorial for Isaiah Emon Shoels, murdered by teenaged gunmen at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999.)

The following reflection is offered by Rev. Bob Davidson, EPF National Executive Committee Chair, and primary organizer of the Remember and Renew Weekend commemoration for the 20th Anniversary of the Columbine High School gun massacre. EPF and all of our pilgrims are grateful for Fr. Bob’s vision for these events, and his flawless delivery of impactful speakers and preachers, and all the sharing, hospitality, and transformative connection which this sacred time allowed.
“There isn’t a day that I don’t wonder if I’ll come home alive from school.”

One of our youth narrators, whose name was Troy and who was 12 years of age, offered this disturbing inner fear while reading the memorial plaque of one of the 14 Columbine students and one teacher who were murdered on April 20, 1999. Several dozen of us walked solemnly around the Columbine Memorial where thirteen of the victims are remembered in a hour and one-half Vigil during a Saturday afternoon of the Columbine Pilgrimage on April 27th.
The Episcopal Peace Fellowship, along with nearly 20 other faith and community-based co-sponsors, marked the 20th anniversary of the Columbine shootings as one of our Year of Action events during our 80th anniversary of the founding of EPF.

Beginning on Friday, April 26 a panel kicked off the weekend that included two gun violence prevention activists, a physician focusing on public health implications and two men whose lives have been scarred by gun violence in their own Latino community. Nathan, who is serving time due to killing someone following a robbery was 14 when he was incarcerated two years earlier. Another anti-gang advocate, Cisco, who came out of the Barrio to now work with others caught in gun violence gave a sobering insight. “For a time I believed carrying a gun would keep me safer. It did just the opposite as I became a greater target because of my weapon.”

The Iliff (Methodist) School of Theology welcomed three African American faith leaders to explore the underlying causes of the Culture of Violence and its root in racism and white supremacy. Rev. Dr. Jennifer Leath, professor of Social Justice and Pastoral Care at the school who spoke about “uninterrogated whiteness” and the disparities of how our culture responds to gun violence in communities of color as opposed to white communities of privilege. Another panelist, Rev. Jasper Peters, shared that as a young black man he had attended the funeral of the only African American student, Isaiah Shoels, who was killed at Columbine. As he viewed Isaiah’s body in the casket robed in his cap and gown he would have received in three weeks after the killings, the panelist lamented, “He had done everything right as a black child and family yet gun violence still found a way to cut him down”. The Rev. Kym Lucas, soon to be consecrated Bishop of Colorado, spoke to the contrast of contempt and de-humanization in violence with the call of the Beloved Community to witness to racial healing and justice.

Following a Saturday morning workshop at St. John’s Cathedral co-sponsored by EPF and Bishops United Against Gun Violence titled, “Finding Your Voice: Advocacy for Gun Violence Prevention”, the weekend events moved closer to the outlying communities where the Columbine massacre had taken place in Littleton, Colorado. A networking luncheon and workshops at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church was interrupted by news that Jewish worshippers had been shot at the Chabad of Poway congregation. As we circled with hands held, Bishop Dan Edwards (BUAGV member) lead us in prayer and solidarity by inviting each of us to name one word we could offer in this tragedy. It was a sober reminder that the work of gun violence prevention has an urgency when daily lives are taken and wounded, even while our weekend pilgrimage was happening.

Probably the most deeply moving event of the pilgrimage followed our late afternoon Vigil at the Columbine Memorial. From the Memorial pilgrims could see the school where the carnage took place twenty years earlier so close to this sacred ground. As is true in all shootings, two other students lost their lives on that fateful day whose names were Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, the perpetrators of the violence who are not memorialized there. Our pilgrimage wanted to also acknowledge the pain and anguish that these boy’s families continue to suffer. During a meal and time of reflection at a Unitarian Universalist congregation whose pastor had been first on the scene at Columbine, ALL victims and perpetrators of violence were remembered during a moving ceremony of song and heartfelt sharing.

The trauma following the Columbine shootings lead to a number of copy-cat shootings, suicides and a testimony we heard from a Lutheran pastor, Don Marxhausen who presided over the funeral for one of the shooters. Because his congregation opposed this outreach to the Klebold family, Don was forced to leave his congregation. Listening to Don preach at Sunday morning worship in an Episcopal parish, it became clear that faith communities are not always willing to have a prophetic witness in the face of cultural forces that deny the gospel of love. Even later on Sunday as a youth choir lifted their voices to affirm a world free from gun violence and survivors gave their stories of recovering from gun violence, the courageous task ahead seemed more and more daunting.

The Episcopal Peace Fellowship was instrumental in mobilizing local and national supporters of gun violence prevention rallying around the twentieth anniversary of a school shooting that still is etched into our nation’s consciousness. The enduring connections made by co-sponsors and pilgrims of this Year of Action event will live on to hopefully multiply the weekend’s impact long into the years ahead.

EPF will now continue its pilgrimage celebrating our Year of Action to events focused around civil rights and racial reconciliation and the cause of justice for Palestinian and American Muslim communities. We hope you will consider your own pilgrimage to these events as you learn about them, but also that you will provide the support for EPF to continue to shine the gospel of peacemaking into often dark places of violence, bigotry and oppression.

Rev. Bob Davidson

Fr. Bob Davidson, primary organizer of our Remember and Renew weekend, moderates the question and answer section of the Iliff School of Theology panel. From the left: Fr. Bob, Rev. Dr. Jennifer Leath, Rev. Jasper Peters, and Bishop Elect Kym Lucas of the Diocese of Colorado. Dr. Leath made the astute observation that “Racism is America’s favorite and primordial form of violence.”
Our visit to the Columbine Memorial at Clement Park in Littleton was narrated by young school children from various Denver schools, and Moms Demand Action, one of our weekend co-sponsors. It was hard to hear the stories of the young lives lost, read by children. Lord, have mercy.
A note left at the Columbine Memorial at Clement Park from the community of Newtown, CT. Heartbreaking.
On Sunday afternoon, as part of our memorial service at St. Andrew’s Methodist Church in Highlands Ranch, CO, the Mennonite group “RAWtools, Inc. Disarm Hearts, Forge Peace” blacksmithed a gun into a garden implement, which was placed on the altar during the service. We ain’t gonna study war no more.
EPF pilgrims Rev. Bob Davidson, Bob Lotz (EPF Gun Violence Prevention Action Group Convener), Maryann Philbrook, Rev. Kay Houck, Ellen Lindeen, and Melanie Atha gather after a challenging testimonial offered by Rev. Don Marxhausen at St. Timothy Episcopal Church on Sunday. We are grateful for Rev. Nick Myers for the opportunity to worship with St. Timothy and for his leadership for so many of our events over the weekend.
EPF NEC member Rev. Michael Kurth offered an inspiring homily during Morning Prayer on Saturday, as the NEC gathered to conduct the business of EPF during our Remember and Renew Weekend.
Reflection for Morning Prayer on the Saturday of Easter, Year C
The Rev. Michael B.E. Kurth
04/27/2019

Reading: John 16:16-33

Our text from John comes from the end of Jesus’ Farewell Discourse (the speech or teachings Jesus gives his disciples before his Passion). His words are some of the final teachings he leaves with his disciples. Jesus knows the road ahead will be painful, so he helps them ponder hope in the midst of sorrow. He also leaves the disciples with a word of peace: “I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace.” “In me.” In Jesus. In the one we believe to be the son of God, you may have peace.

As Christian peacemakers, our peace begins with Jesus. How beautiful a moment at the national executive council dinner last night, when Bob gifted Melanie with the beautiful gold peace cross, an heirloom from his family. It was a reminder to me that in order to do this work we have been given to do, we must literally put Jesus first, in front of us and on our hearts.

In some ways, donning that cross of peace is akin to the armor of God described in the Letter to the Ephesians. Jesus knows the hardships the disciples will face. He alludes to the “scattering” at his death. He knows there will be great disbelief in his resurrection after death. He knows that persecution will continue once Jesus has ascended to the Father and left them to spread the gospel. He knows that in the hours before his death, he needs his disciples to be close to him – and the same will be needed of them after his Easter resurrection.

Today is Saturday in Easter week. And I must admit: I love the Easter octave. It is a time in the Christian calendar when we are asked specifically to give our presence and proximity to Christ. There are two weeks in our liturgical calendar that prescribe specific lections and collects for daily weekday Eucharists: Holy Week and Easter Week. These are two weeks that we are called to be close with Christ, to have Jesus by our side in all that we do.

Before his death, Jesus reminds his disciples “You do not always have me with you.” This is true in Holy Week, the time leading up to Jesus’ death, and so we worship and spend time with Jesus in Gethsemane and at Calvary. But it is also true that we do not always have Jesus in bodily from after he is resurrected from the dead. In the days after his resurrection, Jesus appears to his disciples and followers, breaks bread with them, and ascends to the Father, leaving them (and us) with the Holy Spirit. We do not always have Jesus in front of us, and thus in Easter week, knowing that Jesus is alive and has broken the powers of death, we are called to be close to him, side-by-side, celebrating his victory and worshiping his holy name.

And so I come back to that poignant image yesterday of Melanie putting on the cross of peace, and I think about all of us as disciples, wanting to be close to Jesus, putting Jesus in the forefront of all that we do this Easter week and beyond. And I ask: what is going on in your thoughts as we listen to Jesus’ final teachings? Think of your life as a disciple, your ministry as a peacemaker, and your leadership in EPF: are you afraid of what is to come? Are you confused, unsure of what Jesus is asking you to do? Are you wondering how to best live into your ministry as a peacemaker?

Jesus doesn’t give answers to the disciples. He doesn’t speak plainly to the events that are to come, and frankly, that makes some disciples pretty mad, because we ALL want specifics.

Rather: he tells them to abide in him. It is in Jesus we find our peace. It is by Jesus that there is peace. And it is with Jesus that we can get beyond sinful selves, our troubled souls, and bring peace to this world.

In our conversations today, and in our ministry to come when we scatter from this place, I want us to consider the following: how can we put the loving, liberating, life-giving Way of Jesus Christ at the forefront of our ministry as peacemakers? How can a pacifist, Palestinian Jew be our model for bringing peace into this world?

Might I be so bold to say Jesus may not provide any clear answers to us today. But we’ve been given a directive: to abide in him.

Let all our work point to the loving, liberating, life-giving way of Jesus Christ. In him we will find everlasting peace and the joy of full reconciliation with God and with one another.

Our upcoming schedule:

Even as I write this, we are driving east to be in Nashville for our son, Tate’s, graduation from college on May 10. We have had some EPF stops along the way, including wonderful and inspiring visits with St. Michael’s in Little Rock, AR and Calvary in Memphis, TN. I will provide full updates on those visits next week, since we wanted to dedicate this edition to our Remember and Renew weekend. Looking forward, we have:

May 14: St. Ann’s, Nashville, TN
May 16: St. John’s, Knoxville, TN
June 19: Juneteenth event with Fellowship of Reconciliation, location TBD
June 27-29: Washington, DC “Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action”
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, location TBD
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary, Providence, RI
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Happy Easter!

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

I love how we love each other! On the Friday of our Remember and Renew weekend, the EPF NEC honored me with a reception to celebrate the beginning of my time as Executive Director. Rev. Bob Davidson, current EPF National Chair, surprised me with the most lovely gift: an EPF coss which had been his father’s. Fr. Bob’s father, Bishop of Western Kansas Rt. Rev. William (Bill) Davidson, was National Chair of EPF from 1986-1989. This special present connects me to EPF’s deep roots, and emboldens me to hold a hopeful vision for our future effective action. Thank you, Bob+, for this most precious gift.
Never forget.
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking “Miranda”, her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
  • Home baked goodies (only if you are baking, anyway).
  • Make time to see her and introduce her around!
  • Favorite sites for photo ops.
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
Week Fifteen Update from Melanie
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Fifteen
Alleluia! Christ is risen!
The Lord is risen indeed! Alleluia!
WE ARE COLUMBINE
Steven and I have been in Denver since Friday afternoon. We took the opportunity to attend the memorial service for the victims of the shootings at Columbine High School twenty years ago which was held Clement Park in Littleton on Saturday afternoon. Called "Remember, Reflect and Recommit," the service was a hope-filled event, and in some ways a perfect mood-setter for our own action events set this coming weekend in Denver, details below. It was haunting that the anniversary fell on Holy Saturday, the day when all hope seemed lost to those early mourners of the crucified Jesus. It is our hope that our EPF Year of Action events will mobilize support for preventing gun violence by giving voice to survivors and families of gun violence; by teaching those who attend how to advocate for policy changes; by creating awareness of the contributing factors to gun violence; and by building an enduring base of support among sponsoring organizations of our weekend. It’s a tall order, but if you look at what we have planned, you can see why I feel hopeful that our work here in Colorado can lead to effective change.

The Columbine memorial crowd broke into their hallmark chant, "We are Columbine!" reminding me of Bishop David Rice’s (Diocese of San Joaquin) prayer in the wake of the unprecedented gun murders at the Christchurch, New Zealand mosques back in March, during which he had the entire House of Bishops chant, "They are us!" in solidarity with those suffering from gun violence. (The quote "they are us" is actually original to New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern). It’s true: all of us are Columbine, Newtown, Parkland, Christchurch, Charleston, Virginia Tech and the dozens of other mass gun killings that have happened in the last twenty years, and which regrettably will happen again unless we do something. Join us in Columbine this weekend to learn how to take action to affect change.

Former President Bill Clinton offered this in the Denver Post on the anniversary of the killings: https://www.denverpost.com/2019/04/18/bill-clinton-columbine-shooting-anniversary/


While walking the streets of Denver on April 20, we found this group of young activists and asked them what they were protesting. They said, "Everything!" They lamented that so many others were reveling in the 4-20 haze across the street and said they wished that others cared as much about the environment, income inequality, fair wages, and universal healthcare as they did about legalized pot.
Come to Columbine THIS WEEKEND
for our first Year of Action event of 2019!

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO

JOIN US IN COLUMBINE!

Plan to Walk In Love with EPF this weekend! On April 26-28, we will make a pilgrimage to Columbine, Colorado to commemorate the horrible school gun massacre which happened at Columbine High School twenty years ago, and will rededicate ourselves to eradicating gun violence in America. We will partner with advocates against all forms of gun violence, which includes the daily loss of lives in communities across the country due to domestic violence, urban violence, workplace violence, mass killings, suicide and accidental shootings. Preaching on the Sunday of our commemoration will be Lutheran pastor Don Marxhausen, who was forced out as pastor of his congregation when he dared eulogize, humanize and preside over the funeral of one of the young gunmen. I hope if any of you are able, you will join us in Columbine for what we hope will be a transformative and empowering remembrance.

More details and registration at https://give.classy.org/epfcolumbine.

COLUMBINE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

Friday, April 26
1:00-3:00pm

Iliff School of Theology
2323 E. Iliff
Denver, CO
(paid parking available in south lot B)

Chapel presentation with audience dialogue to include seminarians, faculty, and interested public focusing on underlying causes contributing to violence in contemporary culture.

Panelists include:

The Rev. Kym Lucas, bishop-elect of the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado
The Rev. Jasper Peters, pastor of Belong Church, United Methodist
The Rev. Dr. Jennifer Leath, Asst. Prof. of Religion and Social Justice

3:00-5:00pm

Viewing of Bowling for Columbine, the 2002 documentary film written and directed by Michael Moore will be shown for any wishing to remain in the Chapel

Saturday, April 27
11am-1pm

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Over 12 organizations involved in national and local efforts to address gun violence prevention will present their mission and opportunities for participation. Catered lunch provided with RSVP to frbobdav

1-3:30pm

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Educational and Policy Workshops on topics ranging from history of gun violence and gun laws in Colorado; organizing the faith community around gun violence prevention; public health implications of gun violence; keeping kids safe from guns; gun violence contributing to suicide and domestic violence; communicating with others on gun violence prevention.

Workshops will repeat twice from 1:15-2:15, 2:30-3:30 for opportunity to hear two topics

4-5:30pm

Columbine Memorial
Clement Park
7306 W. Bowles Ave
Littleton, CO

Enter park from Pierce Ave between Bowles and Coal Mine, driving west to parking lot closest to memorial (within softball field complex). Take walking path approximately ¼ mile to memorial. During vigil narrators will lead participants in remembrance of the students and teacher memorialized through readings and responses. Opportunity for quiet reflection and hearing readings of hope and inspiration will mark the time of vigil.

6:00-8:00pm

Columbine Unitarian Universalist Church
6724 S. Webster
Littleton, CO
(1/2 mile south of Vigil)

A simple meal will be provided by members of the church during which vigil participants will be invited to reflect on the impact of the vigil, the events of the day and group sharing around hope for a more peaceful future. Music and facilitation will be offered for participants.

Sunday, April 28
10- 11:30am

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Morning worship service to include speaker, the Rev. Don Marxhausen, Lutheran pastor who presided over one of the funerals of a Columbine student and his personal story as a result.

4-5:30pm

St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd
Highlands Ranch, CO

A Service of Remembrance and Renewal to offer personal stories from those impacted by gun violence, grounding the faith response to gun violence within the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition, and inspiring participants with hope and renewal through music and worship.

Read Episcopal News Service coverage of our event here:
https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2019/04/09/episcopal-groups-plan-gun-violence-action-weekend-in-colorado-20-years-after-columbine/

HELP NEEDED!

Here’s a fun, creative project for the right artistic volunteer!
EPF would like to have limited edition t-shirts to
celebrate our 80th anniversary and Year of Action.
We’d be so grateful for an artist among us
to create an image that we could use to market our
Year of Action and apply to t-shirts and other SWAG
we could sell to raise funds. Interested?
I’d love to hear from you to discuss your ideas and terms!
epfactnow

Our upcoming schedule:

After Columbine, we will drive east to be in Nashville for our son, Tate’s, graduation from college on May 10. We have some EPF stops along the way!

April 26-28: Columbine Commemoration and Colorado EPF Chapter visitation
St.Timothy’s, Centennial, CO
May 5: St. Michael’s, Little Rock, AR
May 6: Calvary, Memphis, TN
May 14: St. Ann’s, Nashville, TN
May 16: St. John’s, Knoxville, TN
June 19: Juneteenth event with Fellowship of Reconciliation, location TBD
June 27-29: Washington, DC "Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action"
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, location TBD
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Happy Easter!

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Easter reminder!
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking "Miranda", her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
  • Home baked goodies (only if you are baking, anyway).
  • Make time to see her and introduce her around!
  • Favorite sites for photo ops.
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
Week Fourteen Update from Melanie
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Fourteen
Black Cross with Red Sky by Georgia O’Keeffe evokes Good Friday
Peacemakers who sow in peace reap a harvest of righteousness.

James 3:18

This beautiful mosaic, tiled by members of St. Bede’s, Santa Fe, NM, is an exquisite addition to their newly renovated sanctuary. Lovelier still are the many parishioners who heed their baptismal call to work for justice all over the planet, notably in Palestine and right here in the Diocese of the Rio Grande. EPF is grateful for the financial support and action of the dozens of members who contribute to our social justice ministries. (I should not have been surprised to find such breathtaking art in a church in Santa Fe!)
I have been looking forward to my time in Santa Fe since we started on this Year of Action pilgrimage. It’s one of those places built up in my imagination by friends who have visited here before as a sort of mecca for all things art and nature. And since I have come to know Catherine Willmott and Kathy Christison through our EPF Palestine Israel Network, I have been even more eager to get to this part of New Mexico. These ladies are devoted activists for justice in Palestine, and are the dearest and most hospitable of hostesses to Steven, Miranda and me. We got to share a moving healing Eucharist, a Bible study based on the parables in Luke, meals, laundry, grocery shopping, two Palm Sunday processions and Eucharists, and a personal favorite of mine — two coffee hours! In a very short period of time, St. Bede’s came to feel like home, and Kathy and Catherine like attentive big sisters, and our time with them leading into Holy Week was, well, holy. Grace upon grace, in northern New Mexico!

On Tuesday last, I had coffee with Michael Robison also of St. Bede’s at Iconik Coffee. Michael is deeply committed to the social justice work of his parish, and shared with me the neatest activist “cheat” I have heard of in a long while. Look at www.5calls.org. Pull up the app, plug in your location, then choose the issues important to you. Once you choose your issues, the app will give you the phone numbers and a tight script for calling your representatives to make your voice heard. Michael pointed out that logs of calls both “pro” and “con” are kept in lawmakers’ offices, and that some believe that calling is even more important and impactful than writing or emailing. The app will also send you email alerts each week to prompt you to further action. I am still a fan of letter writing, such as is done each month at Church of the Transfiguration in Dallas, TX, but this app makes taking political action super easy. Thanks, Michael, for the tip of the season!

Meanwhile, back in Alabama, work against the imposition of the death penalty is making national news: https://www.thenation.com/article/project-hope-abolish-death-penalty-alabama/

Steven and I pulled out of Santa Fe on Monday, drove through scenic Los Alamos for a quick visit with Rev. Christopher Adams of Trinity on the Hill, then stopped for the night in Chimayo after catching a glimpse of Santuario de Chimayo. I usually like to try to do some “office work” while Steven drives Miranda, but every minute and a half, he called out, “Would you look at that!”, so I gave up and rode shotgun. We popped in on St. James, Taos, NM just this morning, and we found ourselves charmed again! Northern New Mexico truly has the most beautiful and diverse landscapes — from red rocks, to snow capped mountains, to pine forests, to scrubby deserts, to placid valleys full of antelope, buffalo, rabbits, even golden eagles, to reflective blue lakes (water!), flowers and blooming trees EVERYWHERE. Plus, New Mexicans seem to appreciate their own diversity as a people more than some folks, and that makes me feel very hopeful for our future.

Onward to Colorado!

Come to Columbine for our first Year of Action event of 2019!

JOIN US IN COLUMBINE!

Plan to Walk In Love with EPF this month! The weekend after Easter (April 26-28), we will make a pilgrimage to Columbine, Colorado to commemorate the horrible school massacre which happened at Columbine High School twenty years ago, and will rededicate ourselves to eradicating gun violence in America. We will partner with advocates against all forms of gun violence, which includes the daily loss of lives in communities across the country due to domestic violence, urban violence, workplace violence, mass killings, suicide and accidental shootings. Preaching on the Sunday of our commemoration will be Lutheran pastor Don Marxhausen, who was forced out as pastor of his congregation when he dared eulogize, humanize and preside over the funeral of one of the young gunmen. I hope if any of you are able, you will join us in Columbine for what we hope will be a transformative and empowering remembrance.

More details and registration at https://give.classy.org/epfcolumbine.

COLUMBINE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

Friday, April 26
1:00-3:00pm

Iliff School of Theology
2323 E. Iliff
Denver, CO
(paid parking available in south lot B)

Chapel presentation with audience dialogue to include seminarians, faculty, and interested public focusing on underlying causes contributing to violence in contemporary culture.

Panelists include:

The Rev. Kym Lucas, bishop-elect of the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado
The Rev. Jasper Peters, pastor of Belong Church, United Methodist
The Rev. Dr. Jennifer Leath, Asst. Prof. of Religion and Social Justice

3:00-5:00pm

Viewing of Bowling for Columbine, the 2002 documentary film written and directed by Michael Moore will be shown for any wishing to remain in the Chapel

Saturday, April 27
11am-1pm

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Over 12 organizations involved in national and local efforts to address gun violence prevention will present their mission and opportunities for participation. Catered lunch provided with RSVP to frbobdav

1-3:30pm

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Educational and Policy Workshops on topics ranging from history of gun violence and gun laws in Colorado; organizing the faith community around gun violence prevention; public health implications of gun violence; keeping kids safe from guns; gun violence contributing to suicide and domestic violence; communicating with others on gun violence prevention.

Workshops will repeat twice from 1:15-2:15, 2:30-3:30 for opportunity to hear two topics

4-5:30pm

Columbine Memorial
Clement Park
7306 W. Bowles Ave
Littleton, CO

Enter park from Pierce Ave between Bowles and Coal Mine, driving west to parking lot closest to memorial (within softball field complex). Take walking path approximately ¼ mile to memorial. During vigil narrators will lead participants in remembrance of the students and teacher memorialized through readings and responses. Opportunity for quiet reflection and hearing readings of hope and inspiration will mark the time of vigil.

6:00-8:00pm

Columbine Unitarian Universalist Church
6724 S. Webster
Littleton, CO
(1/2 mile south of Vigil)

A simple meal will be provided by members of the church during which vigil participants will be invited to reflect on the impact of the vigil, the events of the day and group sharing around hope for a more peaceful future. Music and facilitation will be offered for participants.

Sunday, April 28
10- 11:30am

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Morning worship service to include speaker, the Rev. Don Marxhausen, Lutheran pastor who presided over one of the funerals of a Columbine student and his personal story as a result.

4-5:30pm

St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd
Highlands Ranch, CO

A Service of Remembrance and Renewal to offer personal stories from those impacted by gun violence, grounding the faith response to gun violence within the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition, and inspiring participants with hope and renewal through music and worship.

Read Episcopal News Service coverage of our event here:
https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2019/04/09/episcopal-groups-plan-gun-violence-action-weekend-in-colorado-20-years-after-columbine/

Border Crossing by Luis A. Jimenez, Jr., Santa Fe Museum of Art. So much being done for those fleeing violence and oppression in Latin American, all over the Diocese of the Rio Grande. I am grateful for their good work and example. Learn more here: https://www.facebook.com/michael.hunn.96/videos/10219995813712771/.
HELP NEEDED!

Here’s a fun, creative project for the right artistic volunteer!
EPF would like to have limited edition t-shirts to
celebrate our 80th anniversary and Year of Action.
We’d be so grateful for an artist among us
to create an image that we could use to market our
Year of Action and apply to t-shirts and other SWAG
we could sell to raise funds. Interested?
I’d love to hear from you to discuss your ideas and terms!
epfactnow

Our upcoming schedule:

April 18: Grace, Colorado Springs, CO
April 20: St. Andrew’s, Denver, CO
April 21: St. John’s, Denver CO
April 26-28: Columbine Commemoration and Colorado EPF Chapter visitation
St.Timothy’s, Centennial, CO
May 6: Calvary, Memphis, TN (tentative)
May 14: St. Ann’s, Nashville, TN
May 16: St. John’s, Knoxville, TN
June 19: Juneteenth event with Fellowship of Reconciliation, location TBD
June 27-29: Washington, DC “Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action”
July 12-13: Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, location TBD
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, St. Stephen’s, Tucson, AZ
Dec. 22: National Day of Reparations (FOR) TBD

Are you near any of our planned stops and want to visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Steven and I had WAY too much fun at Meow Wolf in Santa Fe!
Trippy, artsy, musical and full of joy! Highly recommend,
especially if you are missing your inner child.
www.meowwolf.com
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking “Miranda”, her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
  • Home baked goodies (only if you are baking, anyway).
  • Make time to see her and introduce her around!
  • Favorite sites for photo ops.
Some clever New Mexican built a labyrinth in the middle of an arroyo. Nice commentary on impermanence, and proof that art is everywhere in New Mexico!
STAY CONNECTED
Facebook Twitter Instagram
Week Thirteen Update from Melanie
EPF LOGO clear small
Peace Out: Week Thirteen
April Fool’s Day snow just west of Albuquerque
How beautiful on the mountains are the feet of those who bring good news, who proclaim peace, who bring good tidings, who proclaim salvation, who say to Zion, “Your God reigns!”

Isaiah 52:7

Come to Columbine for our first Year of Action event of 2019!

JOIN US IN COLUMBINE!

Plan to Walk In Love with EPF this month! The weekend after Easter (April 26-28), we will make a pilgrimage to Columbine, Colorado to commemorate the horrible school massacre which happened at Columbine High School twenty years ago, and will rededicate ourselves to eradicating gun violence in America. We will partner with advocates against all forms of gun violence, which includes the daily loss of lives in communities across the country due to domestic violence, urban violence, workplace violence, mass killings, suicide and accidental shootings. Preaching on the Sunday of our commemoration will be Lutheran pastor Don Marxhausen, who was forced out as pastor of his congregation when he dared eulogize, humanize and preside over the funeral of one of the young gunmen. I hope if any of you are able, you will join us in Columbine for what we hope will be a transformative and empowering remembrance.

More details and registration at https://give.classy.org/epfcolumbine.

COLUMBINE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

Friday, April 26
1:00-3:00pm

Iliff School of Theology
2323 E. Iliff
Denver, CO
(paid parking available in south lot B)

Chapel presentation with audience dialogue to include seminarians, faculty, and interested public focusing on underlying causes contributing to violence in contemporary culture.

Panelists include:

The Rev. Kym Lucas, bishop-elect of the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado
The Rev. Jasper Peters, pastor of Belong Church, United Methodist
The Rev. Dr. Jennifer Leath, Asst. Prof. of Religion and Social Justice

3:00-5:00pm

Viewing of Bowling for Columbine, the 2002 documentary film written and directed by Michael Moore will be shown for any wishing to remain in the Chapel

Saturday, April 27
11am-1pm

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Over 12 organizations involved in national and local efforts to address gun violence prevention will present their mission and opportunities for participation. Catered lunch provided with RSVP to frbobdav

1-3:30pm

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Educational and Policy Workshops on topics ranging from history of gun violence and gun laws in Colorado; organizing the faith community around gun violence prevention; public health implications of gun violence; keeping kids safe from guns; gun violence contributing to suicide and domestic violence; communicating with others on gun violence prevention.

Workshops will repeat twice from 1:15-2:15, 2:30-3:30 for opportunity to hear two topics

4-5:30pm

Columbine Memorial
Clement Park
7306 W. Bowles Ave
Littleton, CO

Enter park from Pierce Ave between Bowles and Coal Mine, driving west to parking lot closest to memorial (within softball field complex). Take walking path approximately ¼ mile to memorial. During vigil narrators will lead participants in remembrance of the students and teacher memorialized through readings and responses. Opportunity for quiet reflection and hearing readings of hope and inspiration will mark the time of vigil.

6:00-8:00pm

Columbine Unitarian Universalist Church
6724 S. Webster
Littleton, CO
(1/2 mile south of Vigil)

A simple meal will be provided by members of the church during which vigil participants will be invited to reflect on the impact of the vigil, the events of the day and group sharing around hope for a more peaceful future. Music and facilitation will be offered for participants.

Sunday, April 28
10- 11:30am

St. Timothy Episcopal Church
1401 E. Dry Creek Rd
Centennial, CO

Morning worship service to include speaker, the Rev. Don Marxhausen, Lutheran pastor who presided over one of the funerals of a Columbine student and his personal story as a result.

4-5:30pm

St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd
Highlands Ranch, CO

A Service of Remembrance and Renewal to offer personal stories from those impacted by gun violence, grounding the faith response to gun violence within the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition, and inspiring participants with hope and renewal through music and worship.

Read Episcopal News Service coverage of our event here:
https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2019/04/09/episcopal-groups-plan-gun-violence-action-weekend-in-colorado-20-years-after-columbine/

Stained glass window at St. Thomas of Canterbury, Albuquerque, NM
This week we had a holy, productive time all around Albuquerque, New Mexico. Friday I visited the stunning Cathedral of St. John, where interim dean Rev. Dan Webster, who is also a former EPF National Executive Council (NEC) member, treated me to lunch and a tour of the magnificent church building, including their copy of The Saint John’s Bible (www.saintjohnsbible.org/heritage). In advance of my visit, Dan had already recruited five Episcopalians from around northern New Mexico with hearts for social justice to begin exploring interest in forming a new chapter of EPF. Thanks for your inspiring action and organizing, Dan!

On Saturday, Bishop of the Diocese of the Rio Grande, Rt. Rev. Michael Hunn, was having his “Budget Road Show” at St. Francis- Rio Rancho. I attended and had the privilege to hear the DRG’s priorities for 2019-2020, as discerned by the Bishop, the Diocesan Council, and the members of the Diocese, all in concert together, and was heartened to learn that Borderland Ministry is among the top five issues the Diocese feels called to address. When I was able to speak with Bp. Hunn after the meeting, I offered EPF’s partnership in addressing the many issues facing the Diocese along the border, and I look forward to helping to organize the manpower to meet that challenge in the coming months.

Back in Albuquerque, EPF member Anne McCormick, who is deeply attached to our Palestine Israel Network issues, had recruited me to join her in worship at St. Thomas of Canterbury on Sunday. Turns out, Rev. Ted Curtis, interim rector at St. Thomas of Canterbury — who graciously invited me to present EPF to the congregation during their formation hour on Sunday — is also a former NEC member, and has lots of personal reasons to feel connected to EPF, among them his former role as EPF’s landlord for years in Chicago! Thanks for the welcome and lunch, Ted! St. Thomas is a small, mighty group of peace and justice activists, with hearts as welcoming as any I have met. The space in their lovely sanctuary is purposefully accommodating of children, pets, and strangers like me.

Albuquerque surprised me with her already existing vast connection to the social justice ministries of EPF, and it felt like this Year of Action pilgrimage is serving its purposes of reconnecting us to old friends and supporters and expanding our reach. Our week there was pure gold!

Chapel at the Cathedral of St John, Albuquerque,
to which Interim Dean Rev. Dan Webster,
former EPF NEC member,
can trace his call to the priesthood.
Now Dan empowers disciples of Christ
to act on their call to social justice ministry
Natural rock baptismal fountain is a lovely feature of St. Francis – Rio Rancho, NM

Our upcoming schedule:

April 14: St. Bede’s, Santa Fe, NM
April 21: St. Joseph’s, Lakewood, CO
April 26-28:Columbine Commemoration and Colorado EPF Chapter visitation
St.Timothy’s, Centennial, CO
May 6: Calvary, Memphis, TN (tentative)
May 14: St. Ann’s, Nashville, TN
May 16: St. John’s, Knoxville, TN
June 19: Juneteenth event with Fellowship of Reconciliation, location TBD
June 27-29: Washington, DC “Love God, Love Neighbor: Advocacy in Action”
July 12-13:Big Provincial Gathering, Province V, Kalamazoo, MI
August 8: St. Andrew’s, Birmingham, AL
August 9-10: Commemoration of Jonathan Daniels and Martyrs of Alabama
Visit to Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and
Justice, Montgomery and Hayneville, AL
Sept. 4: Bp. Paul Jones feast day, location TBD
Oct 13-24 Palestine
Nov. 11: EPF 80th Anniversary
Nov. 14-16: Borderland Ministry Summit, Tucson, AZ

In addition to these planned stops, we will be traveling north from Sante Fe, where we are right now, through Taos and Los Alamos, then up through Colorado Springs on our way to Denver for the Columbine events. Want a visit? Just shout! epfactnow

Until next time,
power to the peaceful!

Melanie

Among the diversions during our time in Albuquerque was
a visit to Richard Rohr’s Center for Action and Contemplation
How can we support EPF while Melanie is on the road?

  • Give to EPF
  • Offers of hospitality always welcome!
  • Suggestions of icons of social justice, landmarks or museums she must see.
  • Driveway for parking “Miranda”, her home on wheels. (Home or church parking lot welcome)
  • Offer of laundry facilities.
  • Suggestions of coffee shops, eateries, and sports bars she should visit.
  • Identify best walks and hikes in your neighborhood.
  • Invite her to church!
  • Prayers for safe travel.
  • Favorite camp sites (with dump station, preferred).
  • Visits with your pets — she is feeling deprived!
  • Home baked goodies (only if you are baking, anyway).
  • Make time to see her and introduce her around!
  • Favorite sites for photo ops.
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